Category Archives: How To

Simple how-to instructions for weaving, spinning, dyeing and other textiles.

Fish Tanning

I have been working with reindeer leather for the past year or so, hand stitching and making small bags, purses and pouches. My interest in reindeer leather began when I decided I wanted to weave and work with materials from my Saami heritage. My grandmother used to make reindeer leather shoes, bags and other items that she sold to the Sami community in Northern Norway. Many of these types of items were embellished with hand woven colourful bands or pewter thread embroidery. After doing some research in online museum archives, I discovered that fish skins were also tanned and used to make bags and other items.
I first learned about fish tanning during one of the textile and dye workshops that I attended in Finland. I thought I would do a bit more research on the various ways to tan a fish and make it into useable leather.

Wear protective rubber gloves at all times when handling fish. This will protect you from any bacteria that may be on the fish, and will also prevent the fish from getting bacteria that can affect the tanning process.

The basic procedure for tanning fish leather is to remove the skin from the fish. This is easier to do if the fish has been frozen.
Using a spoon, scrape off the fish scales.
Turn the fish skin over and gently scrape off the fat and as much of the membrane as you can. With some types of fish, this can be quite easy to do and sometimes more difficult.
Rinse in clean water.
Soak in the tanning solution for 12-24 hours – sometimes longer depending on the tanning method you are using.
Soften the tanned skin by rubbing egg yolks and oil. This replaces some of the proteins and fish fats that were removed during the tanning process.
Let the oiled skin dry.
Then massage, rub, stretch and work the skin until it is soft and flexible. This can take several hours to do.

Salmon Skin
Salmon Skin

Salmon Skin tanned with Birch Bark
Salmon Skin tanned with Birch Bark

There are many methods and recipes for tanning fish skin. Here are a few, though I haven’t had a chance to try all of them yet.

Urine Tanning
Urine is often used to tan fish leather. The ammonia from the urine helps to break down the fats and fibrous cells of the fish skin.
Urine Tanned Fish Leather

Egg Yolk and Smoke Fish Tanning
This recipe includes the use of egg yolks and smoke to tan the fish leather.
Making Leather from Fish Skin

Bark Tanning
Bark Tanning Salmon Skins

Fish Leather Products
Moon Rise Jewellery
What is Fish Leather

Maeya Amsterdam
Sustainable Fish Leather for Clothing

Kari Furre – A Maker of Fish Leather
A fin of beauty: the art of making objects out of fish leather

Fish Tanning Books
Lotta Rahme
Fish Leather Tanning and Sewing
Lotta Rahme has written a book about tanning fish leather. She also offers workshops in the fish tanning process.

Sami Fish Leather

Look for some of my handmade products made from fish leather in my Etsy Shop.

Salmon Skin Flex Frame Pouch
Salmon Skin Flex Frame Pouch

Salmon Leather Sun Glasses Case
Salmon Leather Sun Glasses Case

ALM EELSKIN EEL FISH LEATHER with Backing Assorted SCRAPS Black Red Metallic

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Saddle Buckskin Leather Deer Hides - Various Sizes

$103.35
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Commercial Brain-Tanned Buffalo Leather Project Piece (1302-5PP-xxxx)

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Skein Winder Counter

Did you know that you can set up a simple bike odometer for use as a skein winder counter? For several years, I have struggled with keeping track of counting how many times to turn the skein winder in order to wind on a given length of yarn. Often I would lose track and have to start again, or recount the number of strands that have been wound on.

As I’ve been winding a lot of skeins lately in order to dye yarns, I decided to try and find a better solution to the counting and keeping track problem. Happily, I discovered that adapting a bike odometer will solve this problem. I purchased an inexpensive bike odometer from Amazon.

You can use the Distance counter on the bike odometer to keep track of the ‘distance’ or length of yarn that has been wound or has travelled around the skein winder. DST – Distance of Single Trip. Here’s how.

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The bike odometer that I purchased has everything you need to get started:
Bike Odometer
Sensor
Magnet
Batteries
When you get your bike odometer, install the batteries as instructed. One goes into the odometer, and another goes into the sensor. You will need to calibrate the odometer to the circumference size of your skein winder (bike wheel)
Use a tape measure to determine the circumference of the skeind winder. You probably know how much this is already since you wind and measure skeins already. But double check.
The bike odometer should work in both km and miles, but I find it easier to do the calculations in metric.
My skein winder has a 132 cm circumference or 1.320 meters.

Skein Winder Circumference
Skein Winder Circumference

Follow the instructions to calibrate the odometer. I set this to 1320.

Then attach the Magnet to one of the spokes on the skein winder. It’s best to put the magnet at one of the far ends of the spoke and not close to the centre. Then attach the Sensor to a fixed position like a table leg. This has to be quite close to the magnet, so that as the magnet passes by the sensor it picks up the movement. In the instructions for this bike odometer, the sensor/magnet distance has to be within 3 mm as it passes on its rotation.

Bike Odometer Sensor / Magnet
Bike Odometer Sensor

Set the odometer so that it is ready to record. You will be using the DST setting. The reading that the odometer provides is the number of meters or kilometers that the bike wheel or skein winder has travelled, not the number of rotations. So this provides you with the number of meters of yarn that have been wound onto the skein.

Skein Winder Counter
Skein Winder Counter

In this example, I have wound on 150 meters of yarn onto the skein – 0.150 km on the DST reading.
Reset the DST reading back to zero every time you wind a new skein.
I tested this on several yarns by calculating how much I thought should be on the skein and comparing it to the weight of the skein.
For this yarn, it has a yardage of 3000 m/kg.
So a 50 gram skein of yarn should have a length of 150 meters.
I weighed the skein and it does weigh 50 grams.
An ongoing problem solved, without a lot of expense!

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Himalayan Rhubarb Plant Dye

Himalayan Rhubarb Dye Recipe for Linen, Cotton and Cellulose Fibres
Rheum Emodi

for 100 grams of fibre
20 grams Himalayan Rhubarb Dye Powder
Put Himalayan Rhubarb into dye pot.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour at 50 deg.
Add pre-mordanted wool yarn and sample fabrics.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour.
Remove the wool yarn. Let this cool and rinse thoroughly to remove the excess dye powder.
Turn the heat off the dyepot and leave the linen and cotton samples to soak overnight. More colour will continue to develop as the dyebath cools.

Himalayan Rhubarb Natural Dye
Himalayan Rhubarb Natural Dye

All cellulose fibres, yarns and fabrics must be scoured prior to mordanting or dyeing. Please see my previous article on how to do this.
How to Scour Linen

For these samples, I used several different linen and cotton fabrics as well as wool yarn.

Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples
Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples

Bleached Cotton
Unbleached Cotton
Bleached Linen
Linen/Cotton Blend
Natural Linen (light weight)
Natural Linen (heavy weight)

More about Plant Dyed Yarns
Madder Root Dye Recipe
Brazilwood Dye Recipe

Paivatar – Plant Dyed Wool Yarns
Look for some of my plant dyed yarns at my PaivatarYarn Shop on Etsy.

Natural Plant Dyed Wool Yarn
Natural Plant Dyed Wool Yarn

Natural Dyes

Anne Georges
Wild Colours
George Weil

Indigo from Seed to Dye

Indigo: Dye It, Make It: Techniques from plain and dip-dyeing to tie-dyeing and batik, in natural indigo blue

Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

Natural Dyes

The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes for Modern Use

Dyes and Mordants on Ebay

Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 4 oz

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Natural Mordant for Natural Dyeing

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Eucalyptus Leaves Dye Recipe

Eucalyptus Dye Recipe for Linen, Cotton and Cellulose Fibres
On a recent trip to Greece, I collected some Eucalyptus leaves and took them home in my suitcase. I let them dry and then crushed them for use in my dyepot.

for 100 grams of fibre
50 grams dried Eucalyptus Leaves
Put crushed Eucalyptus leaves into dye pot.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour at 50 deg.
Add pre-mordanted wool yarn and sample fabrics.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour.
Remove the wool yarn. Let this cool and rinse thoroughly to remove the excess dye powder.
Turn the heat off the dyepot and leave the linen and cotton samples to soak overnight. More colour will continue to develop as the dyebath cools.

Eucalyptus Leaves Natural dye
Eucalyptus Leaves Natural dye

All cellulose fibres, yarns and fabrics must be scoured prior to mordanting or dyeing. Please see my previous article on how to do this.
How to Scour Linen

For these samples, I used several different linen and cotton fabrics as well as wool yarn.

Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples
Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples

Unbleached Cotton
Bleached Linen
Linen/Cotton Blend
Natural Linen (light weight)
Natural Linen (heavy weight)

More about Plant Dyed Yarns
Madder Root Dye Recipe
Brazilwood Dye Recipe
Himalayan Rhubarb Dye

Paivatar – Plant Dyed Wool Yarns
Look for some of my plant dyed yarns at my PaivatarYarn Shop on Etsy.

Natural Plant Dyed Wool Yarn
Natural Plant Dyed Wool Yarn

Indigo from Seed to Dye

Indigo: Dye It, Make It: Techniques from plain and dip-dyeing to tie-dyeing and batik, in natural indigo blue

Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

Natural Dyes

The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes for Modern Use

Dyes and Mordants on Ebay

Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 4 oz

$5.25
End Date: Friday Dec-13-2019 21:06:54 PST
Buy It Now for only: $5.25
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Natural Mordant for Natural Dyeing

$10.98
End Date: Thursday Nov-28-2019 9:28:16 PST
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Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 2 oz - FREE SHIPPING

$6.25
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Madder Root Dye

Madder Root Dye Recipe for Linen, Cotton and Cellulose Fibres

All cellulose fibres, yarns and fabrics must be scoured prior to mordanting or dyeing. Please see my previous article on how to do this.
How to Scour Linen

For these samples, I used several different linen and cotton fabrics as well as wool yarn.

Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples
Linen and Cotton Fabric Samples

Unbleached Cotton
Bleached Linen
Linen/Cotton Blend
Natural Linen (light weight)
Natural Linen (heavy weight)

Madder Root Dye Recipe
for 100 grams of fibre
20 grams Indian Madder Root powder – Rubia Cordifolia
Put Madder Root dye powder into dye pot.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour at 50 deg.
Add pre-mordanted wool yarn and sample fabrics.
Let simmer in dyepot for +1 hour.
Remove the wool yarn. Let this cool and rinse thoroughly to remove the excess dye powder.
Turn the heat off the dyepot and leave the linen and cotton samples to soak overnight. More colour will continue to develop as the dyebath cools.

Indian Madder on Linen and Cotton
Indian Madder on Linen and Cotton

Himalayan Rhubarb Plant Dye
Eucalyptus Leaf Plant Dye
Brazilwood Plant Dye

Paivatar – Plant Dyed Wool Yarns
Look for some of my plant dyed yarns at my PaivatarYarn Shop on Etsy.

Plant Dyed Wool Yarn
Plant Dyed Wool Yarn

Natural Dyes
Anne Georges
Wild Colours

Natural Dye Books

Indigo from Seed to Dye

Indigo: Dye It, Make It: Techniques from plain and dip-dyeing to tie-dyeing and batik, in natural indigo blue

Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

Natural Dyes

The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes for Modern Use

Dyes and Mordants on Ebay

Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 4 oz

$5.25
End Date: Friday Dec-13-2019 21:06:54 PST
Buy It Now for only: $5.25
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Natural Mordant for Natural Dyeing

$10.98
End Date: Thursday Nov-28-2019 9:28:16 PST
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Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 2 oz - FREE SHIPPING

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How to Scour and Mordant Cotton and Linen

The secret to successful natural dyeing of cellulose fibres, yarns and fabrics such as cotton and linen is thorough scouring. The scouring process removes natural oils, waxes and pectins from the fibre so that the dyes can penetrate the fibre more readily. Scouring and mordanting cellulose fibres is a more time consuming process than when mordanting wool and protein fibres. But it is well worth taking the extra time to prepare your fabric before you put it into the dyepot.

Here is a sample of natural brown linen fabric that has been dyed with Madder Root. One has been scoured prior to Aluminium Acetate mordant and Madder dye, and one hasn’t.

Scoured and Unscoured Dyed Linen Sample
Scoured and Unscoured Dyed Linen Sample

How to Scour Linen and Cotton
Weigh out the fabric or yarn you wish to scour.
For 100 grams of fabric I use:
10 grams Soda Ash
3 grams Carbolic Soap
Add this to water and mix.
Add the yarn or fabric.
Bring to a boil and let it simmer +2 to 3 hours.

The water will become brown as the waxes and oils are released from the fabric.
Even a bleached white linen will give you water that looks murky.
Let the fabric cool and then remove it from the scouring soak.
Rinse the fabric thoroughly.

Scour Linen and Cotton
Scour Linen and Cotton

As the Soda Ash has a high pH, the fabric needs to be soaked in an acidic vinegar solution to return the pH back to neutral. Plant dyes are sensitive to different pH levels and this can affect the final colour, so changes in pH during the mordanting process must be neutralized before dyeing the fabric.

Mordant for Cotton and Linen
To mordant cellulose fibres I use Aluminium Acetate
To mordant 100 grams of fabric,
Mix 5 grams aluminium acetate into a bowl or plastic bucket of hot tap water.
Stir until dissolved.
Add the scoured and rinsed fabric or yarn.
Let this soak for + 1 hour.

The yarn or fabric can then be removed from the mordant solution and allowed to dry, or it is ready to use as is.

Where to purchase Aluminium Acetate (in UK)
Wild Colours
George Weil

More about Plant Dyed Yarns
Madder Root Dye Recipe
Brazilwood Dye Recipe
Eucalyptus Leaf Dye
Himalayan Rhubarb Dye

Paivatar – Plant Dyed Wool Yarns

Look for some of my plant dyed yarns at my PaivatarYarn Shop on Etsy.

Plant Dyed Wool Yarn
Plant Dyed Wool Yarn

Natural Dye Books

Indigo from Seed to Dye

Indigo: Dye It, Make It: Techniques from plain and dip-dyeing to tie-dyeing and batik, in natural indigo blue

Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

Natural Dyes

The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes for Modern Use

Dyes and Mordants on Ebay

Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 4 oz

$5.25
End Date: Friday Dec-13-2019 21:06:54 PST
Buy It Now for only: $5.25
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Natural Mordant for Natural Dyeing

$10.98
End Date: Thursday Nov-28-2019 9:28:16 PST
Buy It Now for only: $10.98
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Alum - Potassium Aluminum Sulfate - Mordant - Potash Alum - 2 oz - FREE SHIPPING

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How to Warp a Band Loom

To warp my new Glimakra band loom, I use a method that is similar to the way that I warp my large floor looms, front-to-back. The total length of the band loom is about a meter, a comfortable distance to reach both the back and the front beams of the loom, if you sit on the side, facing the heddles. This will feel a bit awkward at first, if you are used to working from the front beam of a floor loom. But everything is accessible, the front beam, the heddles, the back beam and the pedals. I do find the loom a bit high so that my shoulders get sore while working on it. Sitting on a higher chair such as a dining room chair, or the weaving bench helps to alleviate this problem.
I wind the warp on a warping board. When making narrow striped bands, you do need to change colours frequently, but it isn’t difficult to tie the previous end to the warping peg, and tie on a new colour.
In this simple band, I am using 40 ends of different colours. The draft shows which shaft to thread the yarn through alternating between the 2 shafts, Shaft 1 (Front heddle) Shaft 2 (Back heddle)

Band Loom Weaving Draft
Band Loom Weaving Draft

I have used 8/2 cotton for this band, but you can use any weight of yarn that you wish.
Turquoise Blue 20 Ends
Yellow 8 Ends
Red 8 Ends
Purple 4 Ends
Total 40 Ends
Warp Length: 3.5 Meters (including loom waste)

Band Loom Warp
Band Loom Warp

After winding the warp onto the warping board, I insert the lease sticks into the cross, and remove the warp from the warping board.

I use masking tape, to temporarily attach the warp onto the front beam of the band loom.

Band Loom Lease Sticks
Band Loom Lease Sticks

While sitting on the side of the loom, directly in front of the heddles, I move all of the heddles close to the front. Again, I use a small piece of masking tape on the last heddle, to prevent them from falling off the pegs while I am warping. I start to thread the heddles, working from the back of the loom to the front.
I select the warp ends from the lease sticks and thread each end through the next heddle, alternating between the Front and Back heddles according to the draft. The lease sticks keep the warp in threading order as I warp.
I find it easier to use my fingers to thread the texsolv heddles, rather than using a threading hook.

Band Loom Lease Sticks
Band Loom Lease Sticks
Band Loom Warping
Band Loom Warping

When all of the warp ends have been threaded, I tie them to the back beam.
I use 2 texsolv heddles to attach the rods to the back beam, rather than using the texsolv cord that was provided with the loom. I find the texsolv cord to be a bit too heavy.

Band Loom Texsolv
Band Loom Texsolv

I now remove the lease sticks – they aren’t really needed anymore as the warp threads are all in perfect order. I find it easier to wind on a smooth warp without the sticks.
Again, sitting at the side of the loom, directly in front of the heddles, I hold the warp threads with my left hand, and slowly wind the warp onto the back beam, winding the warp with my right hand. Occasionally I have to stop, and gently comb out any loose ends, and continue winding.

Wind Warp on Band Loom
Wind Warp on Band Loom
Wind Warp onto Band Loom
Wind Warp onto Band Loom

As I am winding the warp onto the back beam, I insert one of the warp sticks with each revolution. This helps to keep the warp tensioning even as you are winding on.

Warp Sticks on Band Loom
Warp Sticks on Band Loom

Once the warp has all been wound onto the back beam, I adjust the warp tension and tie the ends to the front beam.

Wind Warp onto Band Loom
Wind Warp onto Band Loom

As there is no reed on a band loom to help keep an even sett, weaving on a band loom is a bit more free form than weaving on a conventional table or floor loom. I find that it always takes a few inches of weaving, to determine the correct weaving tension in order to get straight edges.

Weaving Tape on Band Loom
Weaving Tape on Band Loom

More About Band Looms
Band Loom Pickup – Simplified
Band Loom Pickup
Glimakra Band Loom Assembly

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Band Loom Weaving Books
Tape Loom Weaving… Simplified
Handwoven Tape: Understanding and Weaving Early American and Contemporary Tape
Norwegian Pick-Up Bandweaving
The Weaver’s Inkle Pattern Directory: 400 Warp-Faced Weaves

XXL Extra Large Weaving Loom Kit (89cm x 87cm) | Professional Tapestry Loom

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Vintage Table Top Loom

$169.00
End Date: Wednesday Dec-18-2019 13:41:35 PST
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Kromski Rigid Heddle Loom 24 Inch

$325.00
End Date: Tuesday Dec-17-2019 6:40:13 PST
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How to Warp a Loom Front to Back

I find that warping a loom from the Front to the Back, much faster and easier than the traditional method of warping from Back to Front. You don’t need to use a raddle as the reed separates the warp threads evenly across the loom. I use this warping method quite a lot as I often put on shorter warps (5-6) meters and work with wool, linen and cotton threads with setts ranging from 5 to 30 epi.

I do use a Back to Front beaming method and a sectional warp beam if I am weaving with very fine silk threads with +30 epi setts and longer warps (20-30) meters, as these can get tangled while beaming.

You can use the Front to Back warping method on any size of loom – a rigid heddle, or a large floor loom.

Here is how I warp an Ashford Table Loom.

Front to Back Warping 1
Front to Back Warping 1

After you have wound the warp, put 2 lease sticks into the cross, and tie this to the front beam of the table loom.

Front to Back Warping 2
Front to Back Warping 2

Cut the warp ends that are draped over the front beam.

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Front to Back Warping 3
Front to Back Warping 3

Sley the reed – Thread the cut warp ends through the reed to the correct sett. In this project I am threading 2 ends per dent.

Front to Back Warping 4
Front to Back Warping 4
Front to Back Warping 6
Front to Back Warping 5

As you thread the warp ends through the reed, lightly tie them in small groups behind the reed, to secure them while you warp.

Front to Back Warping 7
Front to Back Warping 6

Once all the warp ends have been threaded through the reed, move to the back of the loom.
Following the warping plan, thread the warp ends through the heddles.
I usually work with a group of 4 threads, lacing them through my fingers and thread the next set of 4 heddles.

Front to Back Warping 8
Front to Back Warping 7

Tie the warp ends in small groups to the stick or back apron rod that has been attached to the back warp beam.

Front to Back Warping 9
Front to Back Warping 8

Interweave Books and DVDs
Warping Your Loom DVD
icon

Direct warping rigid-heddle loom/
icon

View from the side of the loom.

Front to Back Warping 10
Front to Back Warping 10

Once all of the warp ends have been threaded and attached to the back apron rod, you are ready to wind the warp onto the back beam.

Front to Back Warping 11
Front to Back Warping 11

If you are beaming the warp by yourself, you will need to move to the front of the loom and straighten out any warp ends.

Front to Back Warping 12
Front to Back Warping 12

Smooth the tangles gently with your fingers. Once the warp has been smoothed out for the next 1/2 meter, move to the back of the loom.

Front to Back Warping 13
Front to Back Warping 13

Move to the back of the loom again, and slowly begin to wind the warp on, checking for any loose threads.

Front to Back Warping 14
Front to Back Warping 14

After every 3/4 turn, insert a piece of cardboard or a stick into the warp. This helps to prevent the warp yarns from slipping in between each other as you roll the warp. This will help to prevent uneven tension as you wind on.

Front to Back Warping 15
Front to Back Warping 15

After you have placed a cardboard strip or a stick, give a tug on the threads evenly across the warp to ensure that the tension is even.

Front to Back Warping 16
Front to Back Warping 16

Every half meter or so, you will need to go to the front of the loom again, to adjust the tension on the warp, and return to the back of the loom to wind on the next section of warp.
Repeat these steps until the warp has been beamed.

Front to Back Loom Warping
Front to Back Loom Warping

Once the warp has been fully wound on, cut the remaining warp ends and tie to the front apron rod.
Check the tension by gently touching the warp with the side of your hand. Adjust and tighten any loose sections.

Congratulations! You are ready to weave!!

It can be quite tricky to wind a warp evenly on a small table loom. The circumference of the back beam is not very big (as in a floor loom) so it takes several revolutions to wind the warp on. The thickness of the warp grows very quickly, so the warp tension is harder to control. If you use paper as a divider, the edges of the warp can easily slip and drop to the sides of the wound warp, creating uneven tension.In this warp, I have used the cardboard strips that came with the Ashford loom. They are a bit better than wrapping with paper, but the cardboard is a bit soft, so creates some bumps in the warp as you are winding – which changes the tension of the warp.

Bamboo Sticks on Warp Beam
Bamboo Sticks on Warp Beam

Using warp sticks is a better alternative because the sticks are rigid so the warp can’t wedge itself between other warp yarns and help hold the tension better.
Extra long bamboo skewers are great for using as a warp separator on small table looms. They are thin and can easily be cut to fit the width of your loom.

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Weaving Books
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Learning to Weave
The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials

XXL Extra Large Weaving Loom Kit (89cm x 87cm) | Professional Tapestry Loom

$100.00
End Date: Thursday Dec-12-2019 18:31:08 PST
Buy It Now for only: $100.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Vintage Table Top Loom

$169.00
End Date: Wednesday Dec-18-2019 13:41:35 PST
Buy It Now for only: $169.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Kromski Rigid Heddle Loom 24 Inch

$325.00
End Date: Tuesday Dec-17-2019 6:40:13 PST
Buy It Now for only: $325.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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