Category Archives: Ethnic Textiles

About traditional and ethnic weaving techniques.

Handweaving – Ethnic Textiles: ethnic

Atayal
Kathleen Forance Johnson tells of her experiences with the Atayal weavers of Taiwan.

Cedar Bark Weaving
The cedar tree provided dye, clothing, and shelter to the First Nations peoples of the Pacific northwest.

Finnish Textiles
A gallery of traditional Finnish textiles.

Japanese Paper Weaving
The Japanese have perfected the art of weaving with paper, in the techniques of Shifu
and Saga Nishiki.

Karelian Basketry
The making of Karelian birch baskets, naalbinding, felting and other traditional crafts were part of an EU project, Handiscola.

Karelian Weaving
Special weaving techniques from Karelia, Finland.

Looms
Looms have been used for centuries to create the cloth that we wear.

The Horse Song
A Navajo rug woven by Roy Kady.

Navajo Rugs
Navjo rugs are still being made today using traditonal methods.

Persian Carpets
Some of the oldest known Persian carpets date back to the 7th Century.

Rya – A Brief History
A short history of the rya in Scandinavia.

The Doukhobors
The Doukhobors spun their own flax for their clothing.

The Guild of Canadian Weavers
The Guild of Canadian Weavers has done much to promote hand weaving in Canada.

The Japanese Kimono
From hemp to silk, the kimono has a long tradition in Japan.

V-Neck Shaping
I tried to shape a V-neck on the loom, based on a sample I found at the British Museum. Here’s how

Verulamium
A visit to Verulamium to see ancient Roman spindles, artifacts and other archaeological textile finds.

Viking Textiles
Not all Viking textiles were “rough sack-cloth”, rather they were influenced by the many cultures in which they traveled.

Weaving in Ireland
A quick visit to handweavers and mills in Ireland.

Saami Band Weaving
Patterns for weaving traditional Saami belts.

Salish Blankets
The Salish were known as the weavers of the Pacific northwest.

Woolly Dogs
Eflower describes her research into the wool dogs of First Nations people of the Pacific northwest.

Woven Coverlets
Woven coverlets were popular in the 19th Century.

A Yarn Tells a Story
A 3 metre piece of yarn tells of Norse explorations

Swedish Textile Art
Textile art of Scania is known for its small textile panels made for wedding ceremonies, using an interlocked tapestry technique known as r–lakan and dovetail tapestry known as flamskvav.

Textile Dictionary
Not sure what the word for hemp is in Italian? Check this on-line dictionary for English, German, French and Italian translations.

Rio Grande Weaving Tradition
The Anasazi people settled the Rio Grande area as early as 1300 A.D. They used 3 types of looms, backstrap, horizontal and ground looms for their unique style of textiles.

Turkish Carpets
This site presents an overview of Turkish carpets and kilims. How they are produced, history, functions and some of their regional differences.

Collectors Guide to the Art of New Mexico
Mary Hunt Kahlenberg, a former museum curator, gives tips on collecting, displaying and cleaning textiles.

Elkus Indian Collection
Examples of woven and handspun Navajo rugs and blankets.

Essence of Chilkat Weaving
“The essence of Chilkat weaving is purity.” A weaver is an interpreter who produces a gateway for later generations to access time. Chilkat robes represent a union of the forest, mountains and the cosmology the heart of the culture.

History and Definitions List
Definitions of some Persian carpet weaving terms, by a collector of oriental rugs.

Wrapped in Pride
A Kente cloth exhibit, from weaving the strips to making and wearing the Kente robes.

Small Looms

Tapestry Weaving

Weaving Information

How to fix threading errors, make ladder hem stitch finishes, finishing yardage.

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Viking Textiles: aa042197

It is commonly thought that Viking clothing was rough “sack-cloth”. Not so. Viking textiles influenced and were influenced by the many countries in which they travelled. Viking Cloths have described as layers of simple but well fitted garments, using wool, linen, horsehair and dog hair.

Vikings used fibers and yarns that were readily available in their area. In England and Sweden they had access to linen. Silk was also used in the ninth century. In Scandinavia, very fine cloth with counts of 14×11 and 24×12 threads per cm. have been found. Viking fabrics were often made of worsted wool in twill patterns. It can be assumed that Vikings produced fine fulled cloth as fulling mills dating to the later Viking period are found in Britain.

Fabrics were woven on warp-weighted looms. These looms consisted of a roller beam on top of a heavy frame and shafts of heddles that raise and lower the warp threads. The warp was attached to the roller beam and held under tension by weights consisting of soapstone or Icelandic volcanic stones with natural holes. Stones were attached to the bundles of warp threads. As the cloth was woven, it was rolled up onto the beam. It was difficult to produce even edges in weaving because the weighted warp hung freely. The warp-weighted loom later was replaced by the more efficient horizontal loom, that had a shedding mechanism operated by foot pedals (similar to today’s floor looms).
warp weighted loom

Wool was spun using a drop spindle made of wood or bone, and weighted with a whorl of bone, wood, clay, stone or metal. After spinning, the yarn was dyed using natural dyestuffs. The more wealthy Viking could afford brighter and more colourful dyes. Black dye was produced by making a mixture of cochineal (red), woad (blue) and weld (yellow). White was obtained by bleaching the yarn with wood ash.

Tablet weaving was also popular during Viking times. The tablets are made of flat squares of wood or bone with holes in each corner. These are threaded with the warp with the warp yarn and held in the hands. By turning the cards forwards or backwards by half or quarter turns, the warp threads are raised or lowered. Gold wire and colourful threads were used in the weft, producing intricate patterns.

Tablet Woven Madder Root Belt
Tablet Woven Madder Root Belt

Look for plant dyed tablet woven belts in my Etsy Shop.
The Middle Ages in Finland were influenced by the Vikings and ancient outfits. Threads were spindle spun. A typical dress required 30 kilometres of single-ply thread. Strong colours were preferred. Birch leaves were used for yellow. Red came from the roots of northern bedstraw. Blue from dyer’s woad, and green’s from blood-coloured cortinarius and juniper berries. It is possible that mushroom dyes may also have been used for dyeing their clothing.
Naalbinding Hats
Naalbinding Hats Mittens

Blue Skirts Golden Belts
Finland’s Viking Age Textiles

Viking Ships
A visit to the Viking Museum, includes photos of Viking ships and warp-weighted looms.

Viking Museum at Borg

Female Viking Dress is reconstructed from remains found at Birka.

Nalbinding

Nalbinding Pattern for an Iphone bag

Paivatar Tablet Weaving Cards
Paivatar Tablet Weaving Cards

Please check my PaivatarYarn Shop on Etsy for my new tablet weaving cards.

Tablet Woven Pattern
Card Woven Edging
Fungi Dyes

Nalbinding Books
Nalbinding – What in the World Is That?
Nålbindning – The easiest clearest ever guide!
Nalbinding Made Easy
Viking: Dress Clothing Garment

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Persian Carpets: aa040797

Handmade carpets have been made throughout the history of civilization. Some of the oldest carpets discovered date back to the 7th century B.C. Major Persian rug weaving areas were in Turkey, Pakistan and Iran.

Weaving techniques were passed on through families. Regions and villages had their own unique styles and colours of carpets.

Carpets were woven on two types of looms. The horizontal loom was typically used by nomadic people. The vertical looms were primarily used in the larger cities.

Two types of knots are generally used in Persian carpets.
ghiordes
The Ghiordes or Turkish knot is looped around two warp ends. Finger hanks or bobbins of various colours are picked up as needed and passed through the warp thread, over 2 warp threads and back under the second warp thread. The weaver then cuts the thread after each knot is tightened.
seneh
sehna knot
The Seneh (or Sehna) knots loops around one warp thread and protrudes into the next warp thread. Because the knots are tied onto each warp thread, it gives a more even distribution of pile for the rug. Using a finger hank or bobbin of yarn, it is passed under a warp thread, over the same warp thread and then under the next warp thread. The yarn is then cut.

After a row of knots is tied, a weft thread is woven across the width of the rug, securing the knots into place. The number of weft threads woven, can vary depending on depending on the length of pile and thickness desired. Knots are not tied up to the selvage, rather a technique called Argatch is used to strengthen the edges of the carpet. Extra picks of weft thread are woven to fill in the space of the missing knots.

After the rug is completed, it is cut again to produce an even pile. The carpet is then brushed to open up the pile.

Cotton yarn is generally used for the warp. The weft is made of wool, silk or mohair.

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Navajo Rugs: aa031097

Native American Navajo rugs were influenced by the Pueblo Indians and by the Spanish explorers.

Navajo rugs are handwoven on an upright loom. The wool is handspun and dyed using natural dyestuffs. Black or grey came from the natural colours of the sheep. Yellow was made from turnip roots or sage. Senna gave a rust colour and walnut was used for brown.

Navajo rugs are hand manipulated. Each thread is woven by passing it by hand over and under the warp threads. A few of the techniques, that are also common to other tapestries are described.
slit
In the Slit technique, each colour is woven back and forth, separately. This is generally used in small sections as a slit is created in the rug.
warp interlock
Two colours can also meet by wrapping around the same warp thread. The Warp Interlock creates a jagged edge and is used in diagonal joins.
weft interlocka
In the Weft Interlock, the two adjoining colours wrap around each other between two warp threads. It is used on long vertical joins.


Diagonal (or other) shapes are woven using a combination of interlocking techniques. The steepness of the diagonal determines when to change to the next colour.

D. Y. Begay described the process of weaving a Navajo rug. How the sheep are shorn, the wool is carded and spun on a Navajo spindle and dyed using natural dyes such as mistletoe fungus found on juniper trees, yellow from Chamizo stems and flowers, and rose colours from the prickly pear cactus fruit. She also uses black beans, walnuts, cedar bark, blood roots, onion skins and cochineal for her rich palette of colours.
[http://www.amug.org/%7Edybegay/weavprp.htm]

Navajo weavers today such asLena Ateneare teaching their craft to their children, hoping to pass their knowledge on before it is lost forever. She describes her life as a weaver and her respect for the loom.
[http://www.math.utah.edu/~clemens/Stories/Lena.html]

Fleecing Navajo Weavers
The popularity of Navajo rug designs has allowed some fair trade businesses to thrive while Navajo weavers suffer. Thousands of Diné (Navajo) weavers face formidable competition as their historic patterns, increasingly reproduced abroad, are imported and sold via sophisticated marketing schemes, including hundreds of websites on the internet.

Navajo Women Artists in Resistance are members of the sovereign Dineh Nation. Their website describes their desire to protect their traditonal lands, language and culture of weaving, silversmithing and agriculture.

Sadie Curtis Navajo Weaver

Navajo Weaving Books

The Goat in the Rug
Geraldine is a goat, and Glenmae, a Navajo weaver. One day, Glenmae decides to weave Geraldine into a rug.

Blanket Weaving in the Southwest
A masterful classification scheme for southwestern textiles—and a book that establishes an essential baseline for understanding craft production.

One Hundred Years of Navajo Rugs
Designed for the general reader, museum goer, or collector, it offers a guide to identifying and dating rugs by means of weaving materials. Wool quality, the author explains, is the single most important clue to the date of a rug’s manufacture. Rodee also provides historical background on the great Navajo weavers and especially on the traders who bought rugs from the Navajo.

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$148.00
End Date: Thursday Sep-5-2019 20:50:51 PDT
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$215.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-10-2019 6:25:50 PDT
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