Category Archives: Natural Dyes

About using organic and natural dyes, recipes.

Ikat Weaving: aa100397

What is Ikat? Ikat is a precision dye technique that can create elaborate patterns in woven cloth. In ikat weaving, the design is done by careful dyeing of the warp and weft. First a design is drawn and the warp and weft threads are carefully measured, tied and placed in the dye solution. For fabric of different colours, the ties are removed and the warp is retied and dyed again to create layers of colour.

Ikat
Ikat dyeing can be a very labourious process. Here are some other examples and photos of this method of creating patterns.
In India, sari fabric is woven of silk on frameless looms, taking as long as seven months to complete a sari. The ikat dye process is elaborate, taking up to a month to dye a warp.

The Khemara House in Cambodia trains women to run their own small business. Master weavers are passing on their traditional skills and teaching these women to spin and weave. In Cambodia, traditional dyes were used in the silk weaving. Yellow from the bror hut tree, red for an insect nest called Leak Khmer, black from ebony fruit and blue from indigo. Today chemical dyes are used instead.

In Indonesia both warp and weft Ikat have been developed to create complex textiles of ceremonial significance.

The International Ikat Weaving Forum 1999 brought together scholars and weavers internationally to exchange information about historical, cultural and artistic aspect of Ikat textiles. The impact of modernization on weaving culture is a concern. A revival in the use of natural dyes is being encouraged, training young weavers in the production of “eco-textiles”.

More about Ikat

Weft-faced Ikat

Natural Dyes
Natural Dye Books
Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes
Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes
Natural Dyes
Botanical Colour at your Fingertips
A Weaver’s Garden: Growing Plants for Natural Dyes and Fibers
Eco Colour: Botanical Dyes for Beautiful Textiles
Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

more Natural dye books..

[sc name=”medianet300x250″]

XXL Extra Large Weaving Loom Kit (89cm x 87cm) | Professional Tapestry Loom

$100.00
End Date: Thursday Dec-12-2019 18:31:08 PST
Buy It Now for only: $100.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Vintage Table Top Loom

$169.00
End Date: Wednesday Dec-18-2019 13:41:35 PST
Buy It Now for only: $169.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

[sc name=”Amazon-Bottom”]

Weaving Tartans: aa090697

Throughout history Scottish Tartans have been used for showing kinship with a clan. Theclan system started in the 12th Century. Weavers developed their own colours and patterns for the tartans using natural dyestuffs found in their region.

The number of colours used identified rank, from 1 colour for servants to 7 colours for the Chief.

There are a number of on-line databases with information about tartans.
Tartans of Scotland
Electric Scotland
House of Tartan

Tartans are woven in a balanced twill using a striped warp arranged in the specific order of the clan. The colour order is repeated in the weft. The diagonal line of the twill is woven at 45 degrees in order weave a perfect square.

Tartans are generally woven of wool. Other fibers may be used as well if the warp and weft are of the same fiber, and following the specific order of the sett.

The famous Harris tweeds have their own unique scent. This is due to the type of lichen that the yarns are dyed with.

Crottle lichen (Parmelia omphalodes) is boiled with the wool in iron pots to create browns, yellows and golds. Because this lichen was associated with the earth, it was thought that when undertaking a long journey, socks should be dyed with crottle.

Cudbear (Ochrolechia tartarea) lichen gave crimson dyes. The lichen was sun-dried and crushed. It was then steeped in urine for about 3 weeks, before it was boiled in a dyebath. If soaked in ammonia, cudbear produces a bright pink or purple dye. Adding soda to a dyebath gives a red-purple colour and blue-purple with vinegar.

Rock tripe (Umbilicaria mammulata) produced mauve when the wool was treated with ammonia or urine.

Sea Ivory or Grey Beard lichen (Ramalina siliquosa) were used for orange/brown dye. It was also used for starch in making hair powders for wigs during the 18th century.

Natural Dyes

Lichen Dyes
Natural Dyes
Fungi and Natural Dyes

Tartan Books


Tartan (Textiles That Changed the World)
The sett and weaving of tartans
Tartans: Their Art and History

[sc name=”medianet300x250″]

XXL Extra Large Weaving Loom Kit (89cm x 87cm) | Professional Tapestry Loom

$100.00
End Date: Thursday Dec-12-2019 18:31:08 PST
Buy It Now for only: $100.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Vintage Table Top Loom

$169.00
End Date: Wednesday Dec-18-2019 13:41:35 PST
Buy It Now for only: $169.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

[sc name=”Amazon-Bottom”]