Tag Archives: rag weaving

Rag Weaving: aa080101

Weavers are a very ingenious and thrifty lot. We don’t like to waste anything, especially our own handwoven items. I think for this reason, twice-woven cloth has been a popular method of recycling in many countries. Fabric is cut or torn into narrow strips and used as weft to make rugs, clothing and other useful articles. Different ways of cutting, folding and reweaving the cloth have developed into techniques unique to each country.

In Japan, rag weaving is known as Sakiori and has been used to weave traditional kimono.

In France or in Quebec, thin strips of cloth are woven as weft and made into bedcovers.

In Finland, narrow cloth strips are called Poppana and are woven into clothing and table runners. Poppana is a Finnish technique of cloth strips that are cut on the bias, and rewoven as weft into cloth.

Rug Weaving

Navajo Rugs
T-shirt Rugs
Wagon Wheel Rugs

Sakiori Rag Weaving: blsakiori

Sakiori is a traditional Japanese technique of rag weaving. In Japan, rag weaving is known as Sakiori and has been used to weave traditional kimono.
The rag strips are cut quite finely and woven into a tweed-like fabric.

Sakiori in Nishinomiya
Gramma Ashiwa tears vintage cotton cloth into strips and weaves them into beautiful sakiori

Sakiori and Sashiko

Sakiori is woven from strips of old fabric and is commonly used for work clothing.

Saki means rag and oru means to weave. This site describes the warp as being a fairly
heavy weight yarn. The cloth strips are cut in a zig-zag fashion, about 1/2 inch wide,
starting from the selvage edge, to within 1/2″ of the next selvage, creating a long,
narrow strip. The strip is rolled and used as weft.

Sakiori strips

Weaving with Rags

Rag Weaving
Wagon Wheel Rugs
T Shirt Rugs
Catalogne Rugs

Kimono Pattern Books

Making Kimono and Japanese Clothes

The Book of Kimono: The Complete Guide to Style and Wear

Japanese Kimono Pattern: Folkwear 113

Make Your Own Japanese Clothes: Patterns and Ideas for Modern Wear