Tag Archives: rag rugs

Weaving T-shirt Rugs

I had a pile of my children’s t-shirts from high school, all x-l. There must have been one from every activity. They represented a good chunk of money. I thought I could transform them into rugs.

I used my rotary cutter to make 2.5″ wide continuous strips and rolled them onto cardboard tubes. I got 18-24 ft per shirt.

I had done some reading about weaving and knew the basics. The wonderful people in the chat room encouraged me to grab my daughter’s 20″ rigid heddle loom, any kind of warp thread and go for it. That is just what I did.

I warped 5 per inch with crochet thread that was laying around. Grabbed a balll of shirt and wove. I used the whole ball just to see how far one shirt would go.

Rug#1 finished 15″ x 32″. Not great but looks good infront of my washer.

Rug#2 finished 17″x 32″. I controlled the draw-in better. The colors were planned.

The dishcloths are 10 epi and are made of cotton yarn. If your monitor isn’t too bright you just might see the pastel colors. they are app. 11×11 inches.

The quilt isn’t woven, but I thought I’d show it off, too.

Telly

Telly - Rag Rug
Telly – Rag Rug

Woven Rag Rug
Woven Rag Rug
Hand Made Quilt
Hand Made Quilt

Handwoven Dish Cloths in Loom
Handwoven Dish Cloths in Loom

Rug Weaving Books

Weaving Rag Rugs

The Rag Rug Handbook

Weaving Contemporary Rag Rugs: New Designs, Traditional Techniques

Weaving Western Sakiori: A Modern Guide for Rag Weaving

Favorite Rag Rugs

Wagon Wheel Rug Weaving

Historically, circular rugs were woven on a wagon wheel. You can also use a bicycle wheel, hula hoop or other round frame. Virginia gave directions on how she used a hula hoop for making her wagon wheel rug.

Wagon Wheel Rugs
Wagon Wheel Rugs

Wagon Wheel Rug
Wagon Wheel Rug

Wagon Wheel Rug
Wagon Wheel Rug

Materials and Supplies for Wagon Wheel Rug
There are four main sections of the rug requiring different lengths of cloth:
the main spokes, the fan strips, the inner hub, and the warp.

Main Spokes
You need 6 strips cut 2 1/4″ x 50″ using preferably a solid color. If you buy material for them,
a 36″ x 20″ piece of cloth could be cut into 16 strips each 2 1/4″ wide, all sewn together, and then cut into 50″ lengths.
A 45″ x 15″ piece of cloth could be cut into 20 strips each 2 1/4″ wide and sewn together and cut into 50″ lengths.
If you sew the strips together first, sew them together on a slant rather than straight across. Once you have the lengths cut, do a double fold on the strips turning both edges toward the center and then folding again so that you have strips about 1″ wide.
The Fan Strips
There are 12 “fans” in the rug design, each containing 9 strips of cloth of decreasing length. Since the rug cannot be made to exact measurements, the following are approximate lengths. A different color or pattern of cloth for each strip will give the rug a unique design each time. Since there are 12 fans, you need 12 strips of each strip listed.

Strip 1: 1 1/2″ x 45″ A 36″ x 23″ piece can be cut into 24 strips each 1 1/2″ wide, sewn together, and cut into 45″ lengths. A 45″ x 18″ piece can be cut into 30 strips and sewn together.

Strip 2: 1 1/2″ x 42″ A 36″ x 21″ can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 42″ lengths. A 45″ x 17″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut into 42″ lengths.

Strip 3: 1 1/2″ x 39″ A 36″ x 20″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 39″ lengths. A 45″ x 16″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together and cut.

Strip 4: 1 1/2″ x 36″ A 36″ x 18″ piece can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together and cut into 36″ lengths. A 45″ x 15″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 5: 1 1/2″ x 33″ A 36″ x 17″ piece can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 33″ lengths. A 45″ x 14″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 6: 1 1/2″ x 30″ A 36″ x 15″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 30″ lengths. A 45″ x 12″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 7: 1 1/2″ x 27″ A 36″ x 14″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 27″ lengths. A 45″ x 11″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 8: 1 1/2″ x 24″ A 36″ x 12″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 24″ lengths. A 45″ X 10″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 9: 1 1/2″ x 21″ A 36″ x 11″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 21″ lengths. A 45″ x 9″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

For each fan strip, and remember that there are 9 for each fan, double fold the edges under and sew into 1/2″ – 3/4″ strips. Remember that if you use different colors and patterns for each strip a unique design will result.

The Inner Hub
The inner hub is made of one strip of cloth 1 1/2″ x 48″ that IS NOT SEWN. It will be hand folded. It also needs to be one color, if possible.

The Warp
The warp is the long piece of material that weaves the spokes and the fan strips together. The warp, rather than starting with a very long piece, is more easily handled in 36″ strips each 1 1/2″ wide. The number of 36″ strips will vary slightly depending on the type of cloth used and how tightly it’s woven, but to start out, cut at least 5 strips 1 1/2″ x 36″. More can be easily provided later. The warp will be hand folded and NOT sewn.

Additional Supplies

  • A regular width hula hoop—-not the small size
  • Or a bicycle tire
  • Needle and thread to match the hub fabric and the warp
  • Pins
  • Scissors

Wagonwheel Rug Directions
Round 1: Two solid strips of material must be pinned to the hoop to form a cross. Measure from one point of the cross to the next to ensure exact distance. Overlap the ends at least 4 inches to provide a fringe for the rug when it is complete. Fold over the warp so that the raw edges do not show and sew around one of the crossed spokes in the middle. Weave over and under the other 3 spokes. NOTE: In order to weave, 2 spokes will have to be crossed over or under consecutively on each round. I suggest that you use different spokes each round.

Round 2: Before you return to the original spoke, you are ready to add the additional main spokes that match in color the original crossed spokes. Pin the end of 2 spoke to the hoop, fold it over by the hub, and return the other end to the hoop. Remember to overlap the edges 4 inches. Weave 2 spokes over or under together and continue weaving around the circle. You should now have 23 spokes on the hoop. Measure one more time to make sure that the spokes are evenly spaced around the hoop.

Round 3: Weave around the circle again using the same hub warp.

Rounds 4 and 5: Add an additional strip to the rug next to the spokes following the same process as in Round 2. Continue using the hub warp for two rounds.

All additional rounds: Change warp color. This makes the hub stand out from the remainder of the rug. Add a new colored strip and weave around 2 rounds per strip. Continue adding strips until the “v” or “fan” created between the original spokes is filled in.

When all the strips have been used (the number of strips will depend upon how wide they are), the rug is ready to be unpinned from the hoop. Carefully sew around the outside warp two times. Measure all the fringed strips and cut them to an even length. If washable materials have been used, the rug can be hand washed or machine washed on delicate.

Rag Rug Weaving
Wagon Wheel Rugs
T-Shirt Rugs
Rag Weaving
Roving Rug
Catalogne Rugs
Rug Hooking

Rug Weaving Books

Weaving Rag Rugs

The Rag Rug Handbook

Weaving Contemporary Rag Rugs: New Designs, Traditional Techniques

Weaving Western Sakiori: A Modern Guide for Rag Weaving

Favorite Rag Rugs

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Catalogne Rug Weaving

“Someone asked me what a Catalogne is. Here is the information I sent: a catalogne has its origins in Europe, L’encyclopédie de l’artisnat :Bois et Textiles, 1975, says that it would hold its name from Sieur de Catalan who lived in the 17th century. At this time the catalogne was a carpet. It has been brought here in Quebec as a carpet (most of our ancestors are French) but it was turned into a bed blanket in the area around Quebec city. A traditional catalogne is made out of old clothes while the commercial one are of new material. It is woven at 24 threads of coton 2/8 an inch.

This is my work, I wove it with an experienced women only four months after I started weaving! The design is my own creation, no experience except for some calculations to make it fit. You probably can figure out that I love weaving.

The weft is strips of fabric of 3/4 to 1cm wide. My aunty uses even smaller but does not use cotton weft threads between the fabric as I did. She says it is not the traditional way of making catalogne. She bases her comment on my great grand-mother and grand-mother’s way of working. I guess this is a really godly source to call something ‘traditional’. I did not know that when I wove mine.”

Catalogne Bed Cover
Catalogne Bed Cover

This message was originally posted to our Discussion forum by Caroline –

Rug Weaving
How to Weave a Rya Rug Video
Navajo Rug Weaving
Double Weave Rug
T Shirt Rugs
Wagon Wheel Rugs
Wool Roving Rug
History of the Rya Rug
Hooked Rugs

Rug Weaving Books

Weaving Rag Rugs

The Rag Rug Handbook

Weaving Contemporary Rag Rugs: New Designs, Traditional Techniques

Weaving Western Sakiori: A Modern Guide for Rag Weaving

Favorite Rag Rugs