Tag Archives: organic

Organic Yarns

Crackle
Naturally coloured Foxfibre cotton yarn, woven in crackle.

Paivatar
Organic wool and handspun yarns and unique handwoven products.

madder yarn

Bodega Pastures Sheep>
Bodega Pastures uses sustainable ranching practices in the raising of their flock. Organically grown fleece is available: Churro, Columbia, Corriedale and Romney.

Conventional Cotton Statistics
Some compelling reasons to consider going organic in your textile pursuits.

Hemp Textiles Int.
Hemp Textiles Int. is a wholesale supplier of hemp spinning fibres and yarns.

The Organic Cotton Exhibit
A presentation of many compelling reasons why you should go organic.

Organic Style: Wool
From the Organic Style magazine, an article about the new fashion trend of organic wool clothing. The article includes a hand-knitted scarf pattern.

The Organic Cotton Site
A site dedicated to farmers, manufacturers, retailers and others who are devoted to making organic cotton a viable alternative.

Spring Creek Organic Farm
Award winning, natural coloured organic Romney sheep are raised with the weaver, spinner or fibre artist in mind. The fleece are hand skirted to assure a clean fleece, free of vegetation.

Vreseis Ltd.
Cottons that grow in natural colours of greens and browns are grown organically. Spinning fibre and yarns have been spun in various weights, 18/2, 10/2, 4/4 and chenille yarns, for knitting and weaving.

Organic Dyes

Mushroom and Fungi Dyes
Natural Dyes

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Ashford Joy Portable Spinning Wheel with Carrying Case and Paperwork

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Ashford Traveler spinning wheel, double treadle/single drive, lacquer finish

$650.00
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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$159.95
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Beginner Natural Dyeing: aa010498

Whenever you use dyes, there is always a health risk involved. Some dyes and mordants are poisonous, so use them with caution.

  • Never use the same pots and utensils for dyeing that you use for cooking.
  • Wear rubber gloves and use a face mask when measuring mordants and dyes.
  • Work in a well ventilated area, preferably not your kitchen.
  • Dispose of used mordants and dyebaths safely.

In the summer months, I do my dyeing outside. During the winter, I have a table set up in the laundry room. The occasional sock gets dyed an unusual colour sometimes, but that is better, I think, than making my family ill. Using natural dyes is not difficult, but takes some preparation. Any fiber that you dye must be clean, or you will be dyeing the wool grease and not the fiber. So scour it well, in hot, soapy water. And rinse out the yarn. With most natural dyes, it requires a 2 step process. The mordanting of the yarn and then the application of the dye. Many of the natural dyes also need some time to soak (overnight). I usually do this over a 2 day period. I mordant the yarns on the first day, prepare the dye solutions and then dye on the second day.

Natural dyes usually require the fiber to be soaked in a pre-mordant bath. The mordant prepares the fiber to receive the dyestuff, deepening, or changing the colour and making it more colourfast. I used about 1 lb. of yarn, winding off sample skeins, each approx. 10 yards in length. The day before I planned to dye, I pre-mordanted the yarn samples.

For this project, I am using 2 different mordants, to see what range of colours I will get.

Alum/Tartaric Acid Mordant

  • Use 10% Alum to weight of fiber
  • Use 5% Tartaric Acid to weight of fiber

Weigh fiber and weigh out required mordants. Add mordants to a dyepot filled with hot water. Dissolve and add clean, wet yarn samples. Simmer for about an hour at 90 degrees Celsius. Remove the yarn and rinse well.
Tin Mordant

  • Use .5% to weight of fiber

Weigh your fiber and the required amount of mordant. Dissolve the tin mordant in the hot dyebath of water. Add clean, wet yarn samples. Simmer for 1 hour. Remove the yarn and rinse well.
To save time, you can make larger baths of mordants and pre-mordant larger amounts of yarn, labelling them appropriately, so that they are ready when you want to do some dyeing.

More…
Dyeing with Brazilwood and Osage Orange

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NEWCOMB WEAVERS DELIGHT WEAVING LOOM/ DAVENPORT IOWA

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Erica 25" Rigid Heddle Frame Weaving Loom Vintage Wood Frame Northfield

$100.00
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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom

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Natural Dyes: dyesnatural

Natural Plant dyes and recipes.

Alum Mordant
How to make an alum mordant for dyeing wool yarns.

Cochineal
A recipe for dyeing with Cochineal.

Dye Plants
Birch, Delphiniums, avocado, cabbage and other dye plants.

Easter Egg Dye Project
Dye some eggs and wool this Easter with natural dyes you can find in your kitchen.

Indigo – Saxon Blue
Directions for dyeing with Saxon Blue, a pre-mixed Indigo solution.

Mordant for Linen
How to make a mordant for linen and cotton yarns.

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Blue Skirts Golden Belts
Viking Age textiles in Finland may have used mushroom dyes for vivid colour.

Mushroom Dyes
Recipes and instructions for dyeing yarn with mushrooms

Natural Dyes and Mordants
Using Alum and Tin mordants for dyeing wool yarn.

Natural Dye Plants
Recipes and information about using commonly found vegetable dye plants.

Print Making and Stenciling
A printmaking workshop using natural dyes in Finland.

Tin Mordant
How to make a mordant for linen and cotton yarns.

Using Natural Dyes
Dyeing wool with Brazilwood, Indigo and Osage Orange.

Lichens and Dyes
Lichens have been used as a food source, medicine and a dyestuff for centuries.

Mineral Dyes

Rhubarb Root Dye
A recipe for dyeing with rhubarb roots to make yellow, orange or red shades.

Brazilwood Dye
How to Dye shades of pinks with Brazilwood.

Cochineal Dye
Dye pinks and reds with Cochineal

Plant Dyes
An assortment of plants that produce colour.

Natural Dyes and Mordants
A table of some natural dyes, mordants and recipes.

Urine, Fleece and Natural Dyes
Did you know that urine has been used as a mordant for natural dyes?

Dye History from 2600 BC to the 20th Century
An impressive historical list of dyeing through the ages.

Dyeing with Mushrooms
Hjordis Katarina Lundmark shows her wonderful work with mushroom dyeing. Much of the site is in Swedish, but do follow the links for some colourful examples of mushroom dyes.

Dyes and Dating Caucasian Weavings
An article by Steven Price, describing how dyes help determine when a rug was woven.

Earthguild
Earthguild carries a wide assortment of dyes: Natural, Lanaset, Procion, Deka, Cushing and more.

Henna
Rust with dried Henna leaves and tin mordant, from the Mannam Carpet site.

Hill Creek Fiber Studio
Carol Leigh carries a wide range of natural dye products.

How Dyes are Classified – Natural Dyes
Although this is a site for the medical technologist, there is an interesting article about classifying natural dye substances.

How to Dye Cloth
From the Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute, a lesson plan on dyeing, covering topics of history of dyes, natural and synthetic dyes, textile printing and tie-dyeing..

Indigo
Carol Todd describes growing indigo and her dye procedure for dark shades of blue.

Japanese Indigo
Where to find Japanese Indigo seeds and how to grow them.

Kathryn of the Hills Dye Book
Some interesting natural dye recipes: pokeberry dye, bark, 19th Century cheap dyes, and instructions for using mordants.

La Lana Wools
La Lana Wools offers handspun yarns, natural dyes and a custom-dyeing service.

Madder
Carol Todd grows her own madder root for deep red colours.

Mannam Carpet Vegetable Dyes
Vegetable dyes: Alkanet, henna, indigo, madder, pomegranate, turmeric, walnut.

Marbeling – An Ancient Craft Reborn
Marbling dates back to 12th Century Japan. Rooftop Clothing gives a brief history on the technique, as well as examples of what can be done.

Medieval Gardens
In medieval times, plants were used for food, medicine and dyes. La Belle Compagnie lists many herbs and plants, along with a table of usage.

Natural Dye Research in the South Central Andes
Vickie Cassman did a fascinating research project on dyestuffs of the Andes.

Natural Dyes and Medicine
Rosemary Jacobs explains the connection between vegetable dyes and the pharmaceutical industry.

Natural Dyeing with Oxalis Flowers
Janis Saunders uses Oxalis flowers to dye cotton from a neighbours garden.

Pagan and Lyoness’ Dye Page
Indigo, prickly pear, blackberry, lichen and other dye baths and vats.

Queen Ann’s Lace
The Hollow Tree Spinners dye with Queen Ann’s Lace flowers.

Red with Madder
Mannam Carpet’s recipe for madder dye.

Rivendell’s Botany Page
This site describes the history of natural dyes and contains a chart of some natural dye substances and dye instructions.

Rosemary
Rosemary leaves and trimmings will dye to greens and yellows with Carol Todd’s recipe.

Rug Dyes
Jacobsen Oriental Rugs provides information on natural and synthetic dyes used in Turkish and Balouch rugs.

Sunflower Seeds
Dried Hopi Sunflower seeds and hulls dye to shades of mauves and browns. Recipe by Carol Todd.

Time Line of Major Dye Chemicals and Their Natural Sources
From this un-official SCA site, information on historical dyes.

Traditional Dyes in Guinea
The Quebec Centre for Textile Technology assisted Guinean scientists to develop a better way to extract natural indigo.

Unlocking Nature’s Color Magic
Phyllis Rossiter Modeland tells how the procurement of exotic dyestuffs led to the establishment of trade routes, influenced political policy and the course of history.

Vegetable Dyes – Multifold Advantages
Althought the terrain of Nepal yields over 180 dye-bearing plants, natural dyes are being replaced by chemical dyes, resulting in environmental, social and cultural impacts.

Walnut
Black walnut leaves and husks give deep browns. Recipe by Carol Todd.

The Woad Page
From the Rowan’s Craftbook, growing, processing and dyeing with woad.

Yellow with Safflower
Mannam Carpets’ recipe for dyeing with safflower.

Yuzen Dye Process
Tsutomu Nishino describes the Yuzen dye process that goes into making a kimono.

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NEWCOMB WEAVERS DELIGHT WEAVING LOOM/ DAVENPORT IOWA

$600.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Sep-21-2019 16:00:21 PDT
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Erica 25" Rigid Heddle Frame Weaving Loom Vintage Wood Frame Northfield

$100.00
End Date: Sunday Oct-13-2019 10:09:51 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $100.00
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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom

$102.50 (29 Bids)
End Date: Wednesday Sep-18-2019 18:26:09 PDT
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