Tag Archives: how to weave

Replacement heddle: aa072600

Have you ever threaded a warp, started to weave and then discovered that you have made a threading error? in the middle of the warp? Do you undo what you have woven so far, and rethread your loom (muttering a few unspeakable utterances as you do so?)

An alternative to rethreading, especially if the error is near the middle of a +700 end warp is to use replacement heddles, tied to the correct shaft. In this particular example, I have incorrectly threaded a pattern sequence, repeating it once too many times – in the middle, of course.

The offending threads are on Shaft 3 and should be on Shaft 1,that should form a section of tabby between blocks of Bronson Lace.

  • Find the threads that are going to be moved to Shaft 1 from Shaft 3 and mark them with a coloured thread.
  • Cut lengths of strong cotton yarn for the replacement heddles, making them long enough to wrap around the Shafts with allowance for tying.

heddle

 

  • Find the correct location for the replacement heddle on Shaft 1
  • Use the existing heddles as a guide to the correct placement of the eye of the heddle
  • Tie a square knot, aligning it with the bottom edge of the eye of the heddle

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replacement heddle

  • Bring the 2 ends of the new replacement heddle around the warp thread that you are correcting
  • Tie another square knot to form the top part of the heddle eye, aligning it with the top of an existing heddle

  • Bring the 2 ends of the new replacement heddle over the top Shaft and tie securely with a square knot

  • Untie the warp thread that you are fixing, from the front apron
  • Remove it from the reed and from the incorrect heddle on Shaft 3, leaving it threaded on the now corrected Shaft 1
  • Rethread it through the reed and retie to the front apron

How to Weave

Weaving – Beginner Basics
How to Use a McMorran Balance
Table of Setts
Table of Metric Conversions
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Weaving Books
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Learning to Weave
The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials

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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

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Vintage Floor Loom Weaving 4 Harness, 6 Treadle with Warp

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Loom Ashford Rigid Heddle

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Double Slot Weaving Reed

Sami double slot weaving reed

I found this Sami weaving reed in a small craft shop in Sweden. It is used to weave traditional Sami style belts and bands. The reed is similar to a standard rigid heddle but has an extra set of slots that are designed to carry the pattern warp. The regular holes and slots carry the background warp threads. The background warp weaves a basket weave pattern and the pattern threads float on top of the warp threads.

Sami Rigid Heddle Band Weaving
Sami Rigid Heddle Band Weaving

As I was researching about how to weave pickup with this loom, it was recommended that the warp should be attached to a weaving belt tied around your waist (similar to a backstrap loom) or to a ‘weaving board’ where the front and back of the warp are tied to pegs attached to a long wooden board. Since I don’t have a handy DIY guy who could make such a weaving board for me, I found an art board at The Coln Gallery, my local art shop that I thought would work instead. I attached the front of the warp to the bottom edge of the board with a large paper clip. And I tied the back end of the warp to the warping board that is attached to my loom. As I weave, I advance the warp and tighten the tension on the paper clip. This method seems to work quite well.

Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving

When you raise or lower this weaving reed, the background warp threads lift or lower, creating a shed for weaving. The pattern warp threads remain in the center of the shed.
This makes it quite easy to pick up the pattern threads that you wish to raise according to the pattern.
So that I don’t get mixed up about when to raise or lower the reed, when I throw the shuttle from the left, I raise the reed. When I throw the shuttle from the right, I drop or lower the reed.
The weaving draft can be read from the top down or from the bottom up, according to your preference.

Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving

Weaving from the Left
Raise the reed. This raises the group of warp threads and creates a shed.
Pick up the pattern threads from the middle of the warp, according to the draft plan.
Hold these pattern threads up along with the warp threads that have been raised.

Throw the shuttle from the left to the right and gently pull the weft thread to adjust the tension.

Weaving from the Right
Allow the reed to drop, lowering the warp threads and raising the alternate warp threads.
Pick up the next row of pattern threads,.
In this example I have lifted #2,#6,#10 pattern threads along with the raised background warp threads.

Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving

Then beat the previous weft row into place using your finger and adjust the tension for an even beat.

Throw the shuttle from the right to the left and pull the weft thread into place, adjusting the tension.

Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving
Sami Band Weaving

In this example, throwing the shuttle from the left, I have raised pattern threads #1, #3, #9, #11

Sami Band Loom
Sami Band Loom

Felting and Finishing

When you weave this belt, the weave structure will be quite loose, similar to when you are weaving a wool blanket or other item. After weaving, it is best to lightly felt it, so that the weave structure will come together. The weave pattern has long floats. Once it has been felted these floats will work their way into the cloth.
I felted this belt by handwashing it quite vigorously in the sink – with a bit of dish soap and hot water. And rinsed in cold water to help shock the wool and make the felting process go more quickly.

Sami Band Woven Belt
Sami Band Woven Belt

More about Sami Band Weaving

Rigid Heddle Pickup Patterns

Saami Bandweaving

Saami Double Hole Looms

Sami Weaving Drafts

How to Warp a Sami Loom

How to Weave on a Beaivi Sami loom

Stoorstalka Weaving Reeds
A traditional Sami weaving reed made of modern materials. Stoorstalka now makes several designs of Sami Weaving reeds: standard, double slot ‘Sunna’ and double hole ‘Beaivi’ – and also a new Sami style weaving shuttle ‘Gehpa’. Wonderful!

You can now purchase them in my PaivatarYarn Etsy Shop

Beaivi Style Sami Weaving Reed
Beaivi Style Sami Weaving Reed

Wooden Weaving Shuttels
Wooden Weaving Shuttels


Background of the modern Sami Weaving Loom

Why not a good old loom made of reindeer horn?

2 Hole Weaving Reed
My New Weaving Loom.

Michael Williams Woodworking
A place to buy handmade wooden weaving reeds, shuttles and other weaving tools

Sami Weaving Books

Sue Foulkes has written a few books about Sami band weaving and using a Sunna heddle.

Saami Music – Itunes

Binna Banna – Kikki Aikio
Áphi (Wide As Oceans) – Sofia Jannok
Ulda – Ulla Pirttijärvi & Ulda
The Kautokeino Rebellion (Music from the Movie) – Herman Rundberg, Mari Boine & Svein Schultz
Beaivi, Áhcázan (The Sun, My Father) – Nils-Aslak Valkeapää

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Charkha book style spinning wheel Vintage, Nice Condition!

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Wagon Wheel Rug Weaving

Historically, circular rugs were woven on a wagon wheel. You can also use a bicycle wheel, hula hoop or other round frame. Virginia gave directions on how she used a hula hoop for making her wagon wheel rug.

Wagon Wheel Rugs
Wagon Wheel Rugs

Wagon Wheel Rug
Wagon Wheel Rug

Wagon Wheel Rug
Wagon Wheel Rug

Materials and Supplies for Wagon Wheel Rug
There are four main sections of the rug requiring different lengths of cloth:
the main spokes, the fan strips, the inner hub, and the warp.

Main Spokes
You need 6 strips cut 2 1/4″ x 50″ using preferably a solid color. If you buy material for them,
a 36″ x 20″ piece of cloth could be cut into 16 strips each 2 1/4″ wide, all sewn together, and then cut into 50″ lengths.
A 45″ x 15″ piece of cloth could be cut into 20 strips each 2 1/4″ wide and sewn together and cut into 50″ lengths.
If you sew the strips together first, sew them together on a slant rather than straight across. Once you have the lengths cut, do a double fold on the strips turning both edges toward the center and then folding again so that you have strips about 1″ wide.
The Fan Strips
There are 12 “fans” in the rug design, each containing 9 strips of cloth of decreasing length. Since the rug cannot be made to exact measurements, the following are approximate lengths. A different color or pattern of cloth for each strip will give the rug a unique design each time. Since there are 12 fans, you need 12 strips of each strip listed.

Strip 1: 1 1/2″ x 45″ A 36″ x 23″ piece can be cut into 24 strips each 1 1/2″ wide, sewn together, and cut into 45″ lengths. A 45″ x 18″ piece can be cut into 30 strips and sewn together.

Strip 2: 1 1/2″ x 42″ A 36″ x 21″ can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 42″ lengths. A 45″ x 17″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut into 42″ lengths.

Strip 3: 1 1/2″ x 39″ A 36″ x 20″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 39″ lengths. A 45″ x 16″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together and cut.

Strip 4: 1 1/2″ x 36″ A 36″ x 18″ piece can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together and cut into 36″ lengths. A 45″ x 15″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 5: 1 1/2″ x 33″ A 36″ x 17″ piece can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 33″ lengths. A 45″ x 14″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 6: 1 1/2″ x 30″ A 36″ x 15″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 30″ lengths. A 45″ x 12″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 7: 1 1/2″ x 27″ A 36″ x 14″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 27″ lengths. A 45″ x 11″ can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 8: 1 1/2″ x 24″ A 36″ x 12″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 24″ lengths. A 45″ X 10″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

Strip 9: 1 1/2″ x 21″ A 36″ x 11″ piece of cloth can be cut into 24 strips, sewn together, and cut into 21″ lengths. A 45″ x 9″ piece can be cut into 30 strips, sewn together, and cut.

For each fan strip, and remember that there are 9 for each fan, double fold the edges under and sew into 1/2″ – 3/4″ strips. Remember that if you use different colors and patterns for each strip a unique design will result.

The Inner Hub
The inner hub is made of one strip of cloth 1 1/2″ x 48″ that IS NOT SEWN. It will be hand folded. It also needs to be one color, if possible.

The Warp
The warp is the long piece of material that weaves the spokes and the fan strips together. The warp, rather than starting with a very long piece, is more easily handled in 36″ strips each 1 1/2″ wide. The number of 36″ strips will vary slightly depending on the type of cloth used and how tightly it’s woven, but to start out, cut at least 5 strips 1 1/2″ x 36″. More can be easily provided later. The warp will be hand folded and NOT sewn.

Additional Supplies

  • A regular width hula hoop—-not the small size
  • Or a bicycle tire
  • Needle and thread to match the hub fabric and the warp
  • Pins
  • Scissors

Wagonwheel Rug Directions
Round 1: Two solid strips of material must be pinned to the hoop to form a cross. Measure from one point of the cross to the next to ensure exact distance. Overlap the ends at least 4 inches to provide a fringe for the rug when it is complete. Fold over the warp so that the raw edges do not show and sew around one of the crossed spokes in the middle. Weave over and under the other 3 spokes. NOTE: In order to weave, 2 spokes will have to be crossed over or under consecutively on each round. I suggest that you use different spokes each round.

Round 2: Before you return to the original spoke, you are ready to add the additional main spokes that match in color the original crossed spokes. Pin the end of 2 spoke to the hoop, fold it over by the hub, and return the other end to the hoop. Remember to overlap the edges 4 inches. Weave 2 spokes over or under together and continue weaving around the circle. You should now have 23 spokes on the hoop. Measure one more time to make sure that the spokes are evenly spaced around the hoop.

Round 3: Weave around the circle again using the same hub warp.

Rounds 4 and 5: Add an additional strip to the rug next to the spokes following the same process as in Round 2. Continue using the hub warp for two rounds.

All additional rounds: Change warp color. This makes the hub stand out from the remainder of the rug. Add a new colored strip and weave around 2 rounds per strip. Continue adding strips until the “v” or “fan” created between the original spokes is filled in.

When all the strips have been used (the number of strips will depend upon how wide they are), the rug is ready to be unpinned from the hoop. Carefully sew around the outside warp two times. Measure all the fringed strips and cut them to an even length. If washable materials have been used, the rug can be hand washed or machine washed on delicate.

Rag Rug Weaving
Wagon Wheel Rugs
T-Shirt Rugs
Rag Weaving
Roving Rug
Catalogne Rugs
Rug Hooking

Rug Weaving Books

Weaving Rag Rugs

The Rag Rug Handbook

Weaving Contemporary Rag Rugs: New Designs, Traditional Techniques

Weaving Western Sakiori: A Modern Guide for Rag Weaving

Favorite Rag Rugs

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Weaving Looms – Countermarche Tie-up: cmarchetieup

countermarche loom
These photos and diagrams were originally printed in:

Handbok Iveving
J.W. Carpelens Forlag
CentralTrykkeriet, Oslo
1958
I have added the Red lettering to the diagrams, to help in identifying the tie-ups.

When you begin to tie the pedals on a countermarche loom, make sure that the stabilizing pin is in place at the top of the loom. This holds the jacks in place while you tie the pedals.

When you tie a countermarche loom, all the ties have to be level. All the cords have to be equal length for each harness. Using Texsolv cord makes this an easier task because you can count the number of loops in the cord and also make small adjustments by moving the pegs up or down one loop. I also use a small carpenters level to check that the harnesses are level. There are 2 types of countermarche looms. One of them (Type A) has 2 sets of levers or jacks at the top of the loom that rotate on a center axle. A,B, C. The other type (Type B) has 1 lever or jack in the center and a set of pulleys.

Type B
countermarche loom tieup

Countermarche Loom Pattern Tie-up

The pattern tie-up is the same for both types of countermarche looms.

Bottoms Up

The Bottom Lamm – J -raises the shafts. When the Bottom Lamm is tied to the pedals and depressed, this pulls on the Top lever (C – D) causing A to rise. This raises the shaft at B. Tops Down

The Top Lamm – I – lowers the shafts. The Top Lamm is tied to the Centre of the Bottom Shaft at E – F. When the pedals are tied to the Top Lamm, this pulls down on the shaft causing it to lower.

For a Rising Shed tie-up, I tie all the Bottom Lamm sheds first. Then I go back and tie the Top Lamms.

To hold the pedals in place while doing the tie-up, I prop them up on a rod.
A broom handle and a couple of boxes work fine for this.

When tying up a pattern for a countermarche loom, you only need to tie up the number of treadles that you require for the pattern. The other treadles can be left untied and sitting on the floor. But you will need to tie up each shaft that is operating – to either a top or a bottom lamm, on each pedal. If you are using 4 shafts and 6 pedals, you will need to make 24 ties. Example:

This table describes the tie-ups necessary for a standard tabby and twill tie-up.

Pedal 1 Shaft 1 & 3 raised J – K
Tie the Shafts that will be raised by Pedal 1 Tie Bottom Lamm 1 to the Pedal
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 1 in #1 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 1 on the Pedal 1Tie Bottom Lamm 3 to Pedal #1
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 1 in #3 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 3 on the PedalI – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 2 & 4 to Pedal #1

Tie Top Lamm #2 to Pedal #1

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #1 in Top Lamm #2. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #2 in Pedal 1.

Tie Top Lamm #4 to Pedal #1

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #1 in Top Lamm #4. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #4 in Pedal 1.

Pedal 2 Shaft 2 & 4 raised J – K
Tie Bottom Lamm 2 to the Pedal #2
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 2 in #2 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 2 on the Pedal 2Tie Bottom Lamm 4 to Pedal #2
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole #2 in #4 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 4 on Pedal #2I – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 1 & 3 to Pedal #2

Tie Top Lamm #1 to Pedal #2

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #2 in Top Lamm #1. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #1 in Pedal 2.

Tie Top Lamm #3 to Pedal #2

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #2 in Top Lamm #3. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #3 in Pedal 2.

Pedal 3 Shaft 1 & 2 raised J – K
Tie Bottom Lamm 1 to the Pedal #3
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 3 in #1 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 1 on the Pedal 3Tie Bottom Lamm 2 to Pedal #3
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 3 in #2 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 2 on the Pedal 3I – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 3 & 4 to Pedal #3

Tie Top Lamm #3 to Pedal #3

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #3 in Top Lamm #3. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #3 in Pedal 3.

Tie Top Lamm #4 to Pedal #3

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #3 in Top Lamm #4. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #4 in Pedal 3.

Pedal 4 Shaft 2 & 3 raised J – K
Tie Bottom Lamm 2 to the Pedal #4
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 4 in #2 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 2 on the Pedal 4Tie Bottom Lamm 3 to Pedal #4
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 4 in #3 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 3 on the Pedal 4I – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 1 & 4 to Pedal #4

Tie Top Lamm #1 to Pedal #4

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #4 in Top Lamm #1. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #1 in Pedal 4.

Tie Top Lamm #4 to Pedal #4

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #4 in Top Lamm #4. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #4 in Pedal 4.

Pedal 5 Shaft 3 & 4 raised J – K
Tie Bottom Lamm 3 to the Pedal #5
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole#5 in #3 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 3 on the Pedal 5Tie Bottom Lamm 4 to Pedal #5
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 5 in #4 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 4 on the Pedal 5I – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 1 & 2 to Pedal #5

Tie Top Lamm #1 to Pedal #5

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #5 in Top Lamm #1. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #1 in Pedal 5.

Tie Top Lamm #2 to Pedal #5

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #5 in Top Lamm #2. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #2 in Pedal 5.

Pedal 6 Shaft 1 & 4 raised J – K
Tie Bottom Lamm 1 to the Pedal #6
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 6 in #1 Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 1 on the Pedal 6Tie Bottom Lamm 4 to Pedal #6
If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through the hole# 6 in #4 Bottom Lamm and to the corresponding hole # 4 on the Pedal 6I – KNow tie the other 2 shafts that will be pulled down (Shafts 2 & 3 to Pedal #6

Tie Top Lamm #2 to Pedal #6

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #6 in Top Lamm #2. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #2 in Pedal 6.

Tie Top Lamm #3 to Pedal #6

If using Texsolv, run the Texsolv cord through hole #6 in Top Lamm #3. Pass the cord behind the Bottom Lamm – not through the hole or you will lock up your loom. Tie the cord to the corresponding hole #3 in Pedal 6.

Done! Now remove all the balancing pegs and test the treadling. If your pedals fall to the floor you will need to adjust the lengths of the cords, shortening them slightly. It may take a bit of adjusting to get this right, but once you have the loom balanced and running, it will be a joy to weave on. Changing tie-ups for different patterns isn’t as difficult as it appears. Often you may only have to change a few of the upper or lower lamm cord.
double beam countermarche loom
Double Beam Countermarche Loom

Weaving Looms

Counterbalance Loom Tie-up
Countermarche Looms

Handweaving Books

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials
This book covers basic subjects such as warping a loom and making bobbins of weft, as well as more elaborate, highly decorative projects: baby blankets, shawls, table cloths, and linen hand towels.
UK: Big Book of Weaving

The Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving
Complete pattern drafts for rugs, curtain, table cloths, towels, bedspreads.
UK: Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving

Hand Weaving Patterns From Finland
UK: Handweaving Patterns from Finland

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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

$100.00
End Date: Thursday Jan-2-2020 4:30:45 PST
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Vintage Floor Loom Weaving 4 Harness, 6 Treadle with Warp

$650.00
End Date: Monday Dec-30-2019 20:10:41 PST
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Loom Ashford Rigid Heddle

$450.00
End Date: Monday Jan-6-2020 8:40:59 PST
Buy It Now for only: $450.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Cardboard Box Loom: aa041001

A Header is woven at the beginning of a project. This can be woven of any type of scrap yarn as usually the header is removed once the project is finished. Try to use a similar weight of yarn as what will be used in the actual piece. The Header helps to align the warp into place, allows you to check for threading errors and gives a good edge for beating the weft into place.

Weaving the Header

Tabby

Use a knitting needle or a small stick to pick up the warp threads. In Tabby or Plain weave, every other warp thread is picked up, so the weft travels over and under each thread.

Rest the knitting needle on the edge of the box to hold the raised threads in place, while you draw the weft thread through the open shed.

For the next row, pick up the alternate warp threads with the knitting needle and weave the weft thread across.

Weaving Tabby

Arc the Weft

Because the weft thread travels over and under the warp threads, it is necessary to make extra allowance for this when weaving in the weft thread. Otherwise, once the weft is beaten into place, it will cause the warp edges to draw in, and can result in broken warp threads on the edges of the woven piece. One way to avoid this, is to slightly arc the weft when weaving it across.

Arc the Weft

Beating the Weft

On a larger floor or table loom, you will have a reed and beater that will beat the weft into place. With Tapestry looms, the weft is usually beaten with a hand held beater. For this small cardboard box loom you can use a fork.

After each row of weft or pick, use the tines of the fork to beat or gently press the weft into place evenly across the loom.
cardboard loom

Beginner Weaving Looms

Cardboard Loom Project

Spears Loom
How to weave tapestry on a child’s Spears weaving loom.

Double Hole Rigid Heddle
Add beads to your weaving project.

Beginner Weaving Books

Weaving for Beginners: An Illustrated Guide (Peggy Osterkamp’s New Guide to Weaving Series)
Provides beginners with the information they need to weave in a clear and enjoyable step-by-step way.
UK: Weaving for Beginners

Learning to Weave
Learn such basics as three methods for step-by-step warping, basic weaving techniques, project planning, reading and designing drafts, the basics of all the most common weave structures, and many more handy hints.
UK: Learning to Weave

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy
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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

$100.00
End Date: Thursday Jan-2-2020 4:30:45 PST
Buy It Now for only: $100.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Vintage Floor Loom Weaving 4 Harness, 6 Treadle with Warp

$650.00
End Date: Monday Dec-30-2019 20:10:41 PST
Buy It Now for only: $650.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Loom Ashford Rigid Heddle

$450.00
End Date: Monday Jan-6-2020 8:40:59 PST
Buy It Now for only: $450.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Cardboard Loom: aa040201

You don’t need expensive equipment to weave. A flat piece of cardboard or a cardboard box can easily turn into a loom that you can weave mug rugs, placemats or intricate tapestries on. This is a great project for kids or for teaching beginners to weave.

cardboard loom tapestry

To make a simple loom from a cardboard box, find a good sturdy box. (A shoebox might not be strong enough.)

With a sharp knife, cut the flaps off the top of the box. Then using a ruler mark off the
“sett” for the loom at the top edges of the box. If you are going to be using thicker yarns, you can mark use a sett of 4 epi (ends per inch). Make a mark each 1/4 inch along 2 For narrower setts you could use 5 or 6
epi.
With a sharp knife cut a 1/4″ – 1/2″ slit at each of the markings.
cardboard box loom

Use a sturdy cotton or linen yarn for the warp (the lengthwise threads of the woven piece). Secure the end of the warp thread to your cardboard loom with a piece of tape.
Begin to wrap the warp thread around the loom, placing a thread in each slit at the top of the box edge. Continue to wrap the warp around the box.

Tighten any loose threads to an even tension. Then secure the other end of the warp with another piece of tape.

Your warp of your cardboard loom is now threaded and you are ready to begin to weave.

How to weave on your Cardboard Loom

cardboard loom

A Header is woven at the beginning of a project. This can be woven of any type of scrap yarn as usually the header is removed once the project is finished. Try to use a similar weight of yarn as what will be used in the actual piece. The Header helps to align the warp into place, allows you to check for threading errors and gives a good edge for beating the weft into place.

cardboard box loom

Beating the Weft

On a larger floor or table loom, you will have a reed and beater that will beat the weft into place. With Tapestry looms, the weft is usually beaten with a hand held beater. For this small cardboard box loom you can use a fork.

After each row of weft or pick, use the tines of the fork to beat or gently press the weft into place evenly across the loom.

cardboard box loom

Weaving the Weft with Tabby

Use a knitting needle or a small stick to pick up the warp threads. In Tabby or Plain weave, every other warp thread is picked up, so the weft travels over and under each thread.

Rest the knitting needle on the edge of the box to hold the raised threads in place, while you draw the weft thread through the open shed.

For the next row, pick up the alternate warp threads with the knitting needle and weave the weft thread across.

cardboard box loom

On cardboard looms, or simple frame looms, the warp threads are hand manipulated. On larger looms with more harnesses, this task is more automated. The warp yarns are threaded through individual heddles in the harnesses. By raising a harness or shaft, this raises all the heddles that are on the shaft.

For example, on a 4-shaft table or floor loom, the warp yarn is threaded through the 4 shafts or harnesses. For this simple Tabby weave, the first warp thread goes through the first heddle of the first harness.
The 2nd warp thread goes through the first heddle of the second shaft.
The 3rd warp thread goes through the first heddle of the 3rd shaft.
The 4th warp thread goes through the first heddle of the 4th shaft. In a Draft Plan, the threading would look like this:

tabby weave draft

Weaving Weft in Twill

Another type of common pattern in weaving is Twill. The weft threads go over 2 and under 2 warp threads. On the following row, the next 2 threads are picked up and the following 2 warp threads are lowered. This results in a diagonal design running either to the right or left depending on the direction that you are weaving.

Weaving Twill

weave twill

If you number the warp threads: 1,2,3,4 (repeat)

Row 1

Pick up threads 1 and 2, skip over threads 3 and 4, pick up 1 and 2, skip 3, 4 (repeat).

Pass the weft yarn through the open shed.

Row 2

On the 2nd row, move over 1 warp thread from the previous row, and pick up the next 2 threads and lower the following 2.
Skip warp thread 1

Pick up warp threads 2 and 3

Skip threads 4 and 1

Pick up threads 2 and 3

Skip threads 4 and 1Repeat to the end, and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Row 3

Skip warp threads 1 and 2

Pick up threads 3 and 4

Repeat to the end of the row and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Row 4

Pick up warp thread 1

Skip threads 2 and 3

Pick up threads 4 and 1

Skip threads 2 and 3

Pick up threads 4 and 1

Repeat this sequence to the end of the row and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Twill Variations

Twill is a very versatile weave structure, and you will find many variations in twill design. By changing the direction of the pickup, the diagonals will change to the right or to the left. Twills are also woven by varying the number of warp threads that are picked up or lowered.

twill

Twill Draft

Weaving Clasped Weft

In addition to using twill, tabby or other types of weave structures, an easy way to add interest to your weaving is to use different colored weft yarns. Clasped weft is a technique that uses 2 different colored weft threads in the same row of weaving.

Although this technique is being shown on a cardboard loom, the clasped weft technique can be done on larger looms as well, using 2 shuttles.

Clasp Weft Technique

Advancing the Warp

Are you getting near the end of the box and don’t have room to weave anymore? You don’t have to quit yet, as you still have lots of warp left, wrapped around the box.

box loom weaving

box loom

Slide a knitting needle or other stick under the warp threads at the beginning of your woven piece.

  • Lift up gently on the needle and remove the warp threads from the notches of the box.
  • Gently pull on the warp threads and slide the project forward on the loom, leaving the top end of the warp threads in the other notches.
  • Adjust the tension on the warp threads if necessary, securing them with tape.
  • You are now ready to continue weaving.

Weave a Circle

Although I haven’t done so in this sample project that I wove, you could keep weaving all around the box, creating a complete circle.

Finishing

box loom tapestry

Once you have woven the length of project that you wish to have, cut the warp off the loom, leaving a 2 – 3 inch length of warp at each end for the fringe.

Group 2 or 3 warp ends together and secure with an overhand knot.

Here are some other ideas for weaving with cardboard looms.
2nd Grade Cardboard Loom
These kids in Grade 2 made looms from a flat piece of cardboard and wove some very colorful pieces.
Yarn Weaving
7th Graders wove circular tapestries on paper plates.
Simple Loom Weaving
A lesson plan for weaving on a cardboard loom and learning about the Hispanic and Navajo traditions of weaving in New Mexico.
Childs Elementary School
An inspiring gallery of woven works done by students using different colors and textures of yarns.
Photo Album
Grade 7 and 8 students of Page Middle School wove some pouches on their cardboard looms.
5th Grade Art
5th graders are studying about the arts and crafts of various cultures. They have woven medicine bags on cardboard looms, made ceramic whistles and Aboriginal dot paintings.

Spears Loom
How to weave tapestry on a child’s Spears weaving loom.

Double Hole Rigid Heddle
Add beads to your weaving project.

Beginner Weaving Books

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy

Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving
Wonderful projects and plain-weave variations, this user-friendly guide covers choosing, setting up, and weaving on a rigid heddle loom.
UK: Hands on Rigid Heddle

The Woven Bag: 30+ Projects from Small Looms (Writers Digest Guides)
Each bag is created using small looms, such as potholder looms, frame looms and knotted mesh looms.
UK: The Woven Bag

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Weaving Project – Mirror Warp: aa021201

Mirror warping and overdyeing is a great way to use up leftover yarns to weave a scarf or a throw.

For this throw project, you can search through your yarn stash for all your odd colours of yarns, that you don’t know what to do with. Try to use yarns of similar weights and fibre types. Such as all wools, or cottons. The colours don’t have to be co-ordinated, because you will be overdyeing them, so colour clashes are great for this project.

 

Mirror Warp Throw

Mirror Warp

When weaving a mirror warp, your warp should be twice as long and half as wide as a normal warp and you will need to put a Cross at BOTH ENDS of the warp. When threading the warp to the loom, you will fold the warp in half and thread both ends of the warp onto the loom, creating a mirror image of the warp.
mirror warp diagram

Mirror Warp Throw Pattern

To weave a standard wool throw, I use the following measurements:

Warp Yarn: 2 ply fine wool
(Briggs & Little)

Sett: 8 epi

Width in Reed: 45″

No. Ends: 8 x 45 = 360 Ends

Warp length: 3 yards

To convert this to a Mirror Warp:

Sett: 8 epi

Width in Reed: 45″

No. Ends: 360/2 = 180 Ends

Warp Length: 3 x 2 = 6 yards

Wind all of the warp on the warping board or mill.

Overdyed Warp

If you are overdyeing the warp, Tie the crosses loosely but securely. Also add additional ties to the warp chains at one yard intervals. Remember to put crosses at both ends of the warp. You will be overdyeing the whole warp, so make sure that the ties are secure but loose.
Once the dyed warp has dried, you can now thread your loom.

Weaving Projects and Techniques

Tapestry Pillows
Double Width Weaving
Finnweave
Leno Lace Pickup
Doubleweave Pickup
Clasped Weft

Weaving Books: Patterns and Projects

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials
This book covers basic subjects such as warping a loom and making bobbins of weft, as well as more elaborate, highly decorative projects: baby blankets, shawls, table cloths, and linen hand towels.
UK: Big Book of Weaving

The Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving
Complete pattern drafts for rugs, curtain, table cloths, towels, bedspreads.
UK: Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving

Key to Weaving: A Textbook of Hand-Weaving Techniques and Pattern Drafts for the Beginning Weaver
A definitive guide to handloom weaving: step-by-step instructions, intricacies of color, fiber and how to use them effectively.
UK: Key to Weaving

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Handweaving Information: weaveinfo

Cardboard Looms
How to make a loom with a cardboard box

Baby Blankets
Weaving patterns and ideas for handwoven baby blankets.

Clasped Weft
How to weave using Clasped weft weaving technique.

Computers and Looms
Did you know that that computers and looms are related?

Counterbalance Looms
How to get a good shed.

Countermarche Looms
Countermarche loom tie-up diagrams – Type A.

Countermarche Loom – Type B

Pattern Tie-up Diagrams

Craft Shows
If you weave, at some point you will think about attending a craft show.

DoubleWeave Pickup
Tantrika shows how she does double weave pickup.

Finishing Yardage
When your yardage comes off the loom, the process is not yet complete.

Fulled Cloth
How to full a woollen blanket.

Guild Pillow Project
Take some random warp yarns and a creative guild and you have a unique handwoven pillow.

The Guild of Canadian Weavers
The Guild of Canadian Weavers has done much to promote hand weaving in Canada.

How to Fix a Threading Mistake
Have you ever made a huge threading error, or even a small one, and don’t want to undo it all and rethread? A replacement heddle might be the answer.

Improve Your Edges
One of the biggest challenges for the beginner weaver is to produce clean selvages.

Ladder HemStitch
Instructions for how to make a ladder hem stitch finish on your handwoven items.

Lace Weaving Workshop
Sandra’s guild held a workshop on weaving lace.’

Looms
Looms have been used for centuries to create the cloth that we wear.

Lord of the Rings
Weavers played an important part in the making of the costumes for this movie.

McMorran Balance
Using a McMorran balance to calculate how much yarn you have left.

Product Labeling
Some things you need to know when labeling your handwovens for sale.

Table of Setts
A handy table of recommended setts for cottons and linen yarns.

10 Steps of Warping
You can learn to warp your loom, in 10 easy steps.

Finnish Lace Block Throw
A pattern for a throw woven in organic Foxfibre cotton.

Finnish Textiles
Poppana, doubleweave pickup, Takana, Finnweave, Raanu, Rya.

Advancing Twill Scarf
An advanced twill scarf woven by Sandra

Twill and Tabby Towels
Tea towels woven with hemp and cotton yarns

The Horse Song
A Navajo rug woven by Roy Kady.

V-Neck Shaping
I tried to shape a V-neck on the loom, based on a sample I found at the British Museum. Here’s how.’

Water Jug Warping
How to warp a loom by yourself using weighted water jugs

Weaving Drafts
A collection of weaving drafts.

Weaving with Rags
Sakiori, poppana, Catalogne.

Weaving Rag Rugs
Marianne shows her rag rug woven in doubleweave.

Wool Roving Rug

Weaving: Where to Begin
The Net is a great place to begin to learn about weaving.

Weaving: Where to Begin, Part 2
Join a local weavers guild for support.

Weavers Podcasts

Teaching Others
A podcast on Teaching others to Weave and an Interview with Judith MacKenzie

Ashenhurst’s Formula
A precise formula for determining the correct sett.

Collectors Guide to the Art of New Mexico
Mary Hunt Kahlenberg, a former museum curator, gives tips on collecting, displaying and cleaning textiles.

Conversion Tool
From FiberLinks, an on-line tool for converting ounces to grams.

Counterbalance, Jack, Countermarche
Leclerc gives some technical info comparing counterbalance, countermarche and jack loom systems.

History and Definitions List
Definitions of some Persian carpet weaving terms, by a collector of oriental rugs.

Halfway Tree Loom Construction
Halfway Tree has lots of information on building your own floor or table loom with references to books and building plans.

How to Build a Frame Loom
Easy to follow diagrams for building your own simple frame loom.

Loom-Shaped Clothing
Clothing can be designed directly on the loom. The shapes are woven and then assembled into a finished garment.

Right From the Start
Marcy Petrini provides some handy tables on project sizes, take-up and shrinkage and warp calculations.

Sectional Warping – J-comp
Sectional warping of the Jcomp loom is demonstrated with photos.

Sett Chart
Treenway has a reference chart of recommended setts for silk and other great information about weaving with silk yarns.

Spinning with a Top- Whorl Drop Spindle
Carol Cassidy-Fayer describes in excellent detail spinning with a drop spindle and warns of possible habit-forming and obsessive behaviours such as hoarding fibre.

Taquete
Lillian Whipple shows how she uses taquete to weave small motifs for note cards.

Textile Dictionary
Not sure what the word for hemp is in Italian? Check this on-line dictionary for English, German, French and Italian translations.

Weavers Friend
Janet Meany has an excellent resource library of manuals for historic looms.

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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

$100.00
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Vintage Floor Loom Weaving 4 Harness, 6 Treadle with Warp

$650.00
End Date: Monday Dec-30-2019 20:10:41 PST
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Loom Ashford Rigid Heddle

$450.00
End Date: Monday Jan-6-2020 8:40:59 PST
Buy It Now for only: $450.00
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