Tag Archives: handweaving

Hazards of Loom Dust

My studio is filled with weaving looms of many sizes ranging from large floor looms, to 4 shaft table looms, band looms and inkle looms. If you are a weaver, you will have noticed that during weaving, dust bunnies collect under the loom. In the past, I haven’t been too concerned about this except to pull out my vacuum cleaner and clean it up.

However, a few months ago I caught that flu bug that has been making its rounds, with one of the symptoms being an annoying cough that doesn’t seem to go away. After about a week, the cough seemed to clear up, but another week later, it came back. Many of my neighbours had it, and also friends in Canada said it was making the rounds there as well. So I wasn’t too concerned about the cough, and thought it was just more of the same thing. I did notice that my cough seemed to be worse about a month ago when I wove a lengthy linen warp. The loom dust under my loom was very fine, much more so than when weaving with wool yarns.

Over the recent months, I have also made a transition to dyeing wool and cotton yarns using natural dyes, rather than the vinegar/acid based dyes that I have used previously. Many of the natural dyes come in fine ground powder form, often using wood chips such as birch bark, logwood, brazilwood, madder root. The fine powder is placed into the dyepot, the pre-mordanted yarn is steeped in the dyebath for a few hours and then removed. The yarn is rinsed out in the sink and hung up to dry. After drying, there is still a lot of fine wood chip dye residue left on the yarn. I rewind the skeins into yarn balls or reskein. During this process, much of the natural dye residue falls off. I vacuum the fine dust from the floor.

A few days ago, I started to weave a Sami style band on my table loom. I was using a combination of wool and natural unbleached cotton yarns. I dyed the yarns using natural dyes.

Woven Sami Band
Woven Sami Band

After I wove for a bit, I noticed that some loom dust was collecting on the table, under the loom. I vacuumed this up in the evening before I left the studio. The next morning I returned to weaving this band. After about 2 hours, I had another terrible coughing fit. And again, I noticed an accumulation of loom dust under the table loom.

And I start to wonder, how much of this fine dye dust or loom dust am I breathing in? Can this be a cause of my almost chronic cough?
At that point I took some allergy medication and went out for a walk in the fresh air. My breathing seemed to clear up and I had a full nights restful sleep. The following day, I was away and didn’t go into the studio. I have felt much better the past few days with very little coughing.
I spend a few hours on trusty Google to research about the environmental hazards of the craft and textile work that I do.
I have since ordered an air purifier (Vax ACAMV101 Pure Air 300 Air Purifier) and dust ventilation masks.
I looked for an air purifier that has high CADR ratings hoping that it will be effective in clearing much of the harmful dust from the air.
I am now waiting for the air purifier and dust masks to be delivered before I continue working in the studio.

Air Purifier
Air Purifier

This air purifier really does work. I leave it running on the Auto setting during the day. When I wind a skein of yarn from the swift into a ball, the green light changes to Red and the fan comes on at full speed. And when I am at my loom weaving a rug, the air purifier also goes into action with lights glowing red, and fan speeding up. After a weaving session, I now set the fan speed to high for about an hour, so it can continue to clear the air for my next return to the studio.

Best Air Purifiers – Trusted Reviews
Blueair Classic 203 Slim HepaSilent Air-Purification System, Allergy and Dust Reducer, Small Rooms 237 sq. ft., White
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As natural dyers we are aware that many mordants used in natural dyes can be dangerous to your health. For example, Rhubarb leaves are used as a mordant but are high in oxalic acid that is corrosive, and can cause acid burns, ulcers, and is hazardous by skin contact, inhalation, and ingestion. Sodium hydrosulphite or sodium diothinate which is often used when creating an indigo vat, can be explosive when added too quickly to the vat. When heated or allowed to stand in basic solution, sodium hydrosulfite decomposes to form highly toxic sulfur dioxide gas. For those who use acid dyes, vinegar or acetic acid fumes can cause damage to the lining of the nose, throat and lungs.
Some natural dyes themselves also contain toxic chemicals. For example, Logwood contains hematein or hematoxlyn can be poisonous if inhaled, absorbed through the skin or ingested. Madder root contains alizarin and purpurin that have been associated with kidney damage in animal experiments.
Wood chips and wood dust such as birch bark, logwood and other tree barks are also used as natural dyes but can also pose dangers to your health. Breathing in wood dust can cause allergic reactions, asthma as well as nose and lung cancer.

I also tend to have a high sensitivity to moulds, so I try to avoid working with natural dye fermentation types of dyes. The indigo vats that I have seem to be ok, but I notice that as soon as the natural dye pots start to ferment (usually after a few days) they make me ill. So I dispose of them immediately. As lovely as some of the natural fermented colours can be, in my opinion, it’s not worth the health risk to myself.

Although I work on a small scale and not in a large industrial setting, textile hazards are still something to think about. Be careful when handling any type of dyestuff or mordant, even if it is ‘natural’. Wear appropriate protective gear, gloves, facemasks, clothing and ensure that your studio has good ventilation.

References:
Textile Dust and Endotoxins
Exposure to Dust and Endotoxin in Textile Processing Workers
Cotton Dust – Impact On Human Health And Environment In The Textile Industry
A Study on Health Issues of Weavers (Handloom Weaving)

Natural Dyes and Dye Safety

Dyes and dyeing – Safety
Dyes Synthetic and Natural
10 Toxic Chemicals To Avoid In Your Products
Toxicity and Environmental Damage Associated with Logwood and Other Natural Dyes
Health Hazards – Wood Dust
Dyeing Safely Overview
Natural Dyes International

Weaving Books

The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Learning to Weave

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials

Weaving on Ebay

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Paivatar yarns

As many of you may know, I have been a handweaver and spinner for many years. In addition to managing this website, I also have another website through which I market and sell my own handspun and handwoven products. I like to work with natural fibres and eco-friendly dyes.

Some time ago, I moved to Chichester, which is located on the south coast of England, in the county of West Sussex. I retired from work recently so now have more time to devote to spinning yarn and making pretty things.

The local Council of Chichester operates a bi-weekly farmers market providing local farmers a venue to sell their farm products. I have applied for permission to operate a market stall where I hope to sell my hanspun wools and wares. Part of their criteria for operating a market stall is that at least 30 % of the products are obtained locally – within a 30 mile radius of the city of Chichester. I agree with the council’s strict criteria and am happy to support the local farming community.

This has now led me on a search for locally grown fleece. Previously I was purchasing wool roving from the UK mills and weaving shops. However, the mills are often not able to identify which sheep farm the wool came from.
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Over the last few weeks I have met some wonderful farmers and visited their farms and pastures where the sheep and alpaca graze.
I am still waiting to hear whether my application will be successful – fingers crossed.
If not – I have enjoyed the adventure and it has led me to some lovely countryside adventures as well as new sources for fibre.

I have also had some difficulties in sourcing suitable fleece. I visited a sheep farm today, hoping to purchase some coloured fleece. Sadly, although the fleece were in reasonable condition, they were not of a fine enough quality for hand spinning yarns suitable for knitting clothing. It would be good fleece for rug yarns however. I considered purchasing the lot and sending it to a local mill to be cleaned and carded. I could use it for weaving rugs, but this isn’t the current quest, so decided I would leave this for another day.

The farmer admitted that he was primarily concerned with breeding sheep for food production rather than for the wool. He shears his sheep and sends it off to the wool marketing board where it is graded and sent to mills for processing into yarn but he doesn’t know what type of yarn is produced. I think if we as hand spinners wish to keep this craft alive and want to support good quality local wool production, we have to become more demanding and ask farmers to also consider breeding sheep for wool and not only for meat.

I thought that I would set up a Facebook page to document the places I go, the farmers I meet and also have a daily record that shows what I have carded, spun, and dyed today.
I hope that you will enjoy following along and that it will inspire you to get spinning!
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Paivatar Yarn Page on Facebook

And you can find some of my handspun items for sale on
Paivatar Shop on Etsy
and also on
Paivatar Shop on Folksy

Campaign for Wool

Live Naturally and Choose Wool
HRH the Prince of Wales speaks about the decline of the British wool trade.

Hand Spinning Books

Spinning and Dyeing Yarn: The Home Spinners Guide to Creating Traditional and Art Yarns
Yarn Works: How to Spin, Dye, and Knit Your Own Yarn
The Practical Spinner’s Guide – Rare Luxury Fibers

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V-Neck shaping: aa030505

As I wander through the numerous museums in and around London, and view the exhibits and artifacts , I see lots of intricate pottery in the collections. A lot is known about pottery because it is an art form that is durable and can withstand being buried for centuries. But textiles are fragile and often all that is found is small fragments, that are often overlooked by the archaeologist. When textile fragments are found they are carefully cleaned. They are brought out on display in museums for short lengths of time and then stored in carefully controlled vaults to help preserve them from the elements.

When I do come across the textile pieces I get quite excited, I look at them carefully and then often wonder, “Now, how did they do that?” Lots of questions come to mind whenever I look at an ancient textile.

As weavers and handspinners, we appreciate the work that can go into a piece of fabric. We know what was involved in the processing of the cotton, hemp, linen or wool. The work that was needed to clean and scour the fleece, or to harvest and rett the flax, and then hours involved in handspinning the yarn.

If the garment was dyed, then what was involved in the dye process? The dyeplants would have been gathered in season, and prepared for the dyebath. The yarn would have been mordanted and then dyed.

And if the piece was woven, what type of loom was it woven on? How many shafts? Is there a pattern? The warp would have been carefully planned and calculated. What was its use? Who was it for? How many threads per inch? How should the yarn be spun? At what twist? The weaver of this cloth of ancient time would have had many of the same thoughts in mind as we do now when we plan our projects.

During an afternoon touring the British Museum, in London, I noticed this handwoven cotton top. On closer examination, I realized that the V-neck had no sewn selvages, so I think it must have been shaped on the loom.

This particular piece of work has been on my mind for some time. How was it shaped? How could I duplicate this piece of work? I had an idea and to test my theory of the shaping of the neck of this garment, I tried it on the end of a hemp warp that I had on my loom.

I tested the weaving for the neckline, but still have further questions and things to explore at another time. There is some sort of pattern at the bottom egde of the garment. And how was the fringework done?

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Cotton Garment
3rd-4th Century ADFrom Qasr Ibrim
This section of undyed cotton formed part of a garment resembling the modern ‘bikini’
top
British Museum, London, UK

On closer examination, it looked like the V-neck had no sewn selvages, so I think it must have been shaped on the loom.

To test my theory of the shaping of this garment, I tried the technique on the remaining yardage of a hemp warp that I had on my loom.

I had previously woven a couple of hemp shawls on this warp and had about a yard of warp left to weave.

Warp:

3 ply white and natural hemp, random warp dyed with Cochineal, Madder

Sett: 10 epi

No. Ends:200

hempwarp81.jpg

Armhole Shaping:

Starting at one of the outside selvages (left side), I cut one warp thread at the selvage (at the back of the warp) and wove it as weft to the opposite edge (right side). I changed sheds and wove it back across 3 ends, to make a clean edge finish.

Working from the right side this time, I cut one warp thread on the right selvage edge at the back of the loom, and wove it across to the left selvage. I changed sheds and wove this back 3 warp threads.

I continued on in this fashion for about 1 -2 inches, cutting 1 warp thread at a time and weaving it across and tucking it back into the edge. The weft ends can be cut after the warp is removed from the loom. Sometimes I find it easier to trim them as I am weaving.

hempwarp82.jpg

V-Neck Shaping

To start the beginning of the V-neck, I cut 1 warp thread from each side of the warp and using it as a weft yarn, wove it to the centre of the warp. I changed sheds and then wove the warp thread back to the outside edge, tucking it in as before.

Then I cut 2 warp threads from the centre of the warp (at the back of the loom)

Treating them as a weft yarn, I wove them to the outside edge, changed sheds and wove them back to the centre.

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I then continued on weaving, alternating with cutting the 2 outside edge warp threads and the next 2 centre threads.

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The weft threads can be trimmed as you are weaving, or can be left and trimmed after the fabric is off the loom. I have trimmed the weft threads on the right side of this but left them on the left side.

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The British Museum
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Handweaving Books

Women’s Work: The First 20,000 Years: Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times
New discoveries about the textile arts reveal women’s unexpectedly influential role in ancient societies.
Twenty thousand years ago, women were making and wearing the first clothing created from spun fibers. In fact, right up to the Industrial Revolution the fiber arts were an enormous economic force, belonging primarily to women.

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WPA: blclipart6

American Memory Collections

A comprehensive database of sound and image files.

American Memory and Copyright

Lists information about the rights of use of American Memory collection materials.

 

The Weavers – Mayan Theatre

Published: California, Federal Art Project (1936-1941)

Digital ID: cph 3b49045 Source: color film copy slide

 
Weaving poster

Works Progress Administration Poster

Stylized spinning wheel and potter’s wheel

Artist: Richard Halls

Published: WPA Federal Art Project (1936-1938)

Digital ID: cph 3f05317 Source: color film copy slide

 
 

Craft School: Henry Street Settlement

Pottery, weaving, painting, drawing, woodcarving, sewing, needlework.

Artist: Jerome Henry Rothstein

Published: WPA Federal Art Project (1936-1939)

Digital ID: cph 3f05389t Source: color film copy slide

 
 

 

Free Instruction: Harlem Community Center

Pottery, weaving, painting, drawing, woodcarving, sewing, needlework.

Artist: Jerome Henry Rothstein

Published: WPA Federal Art Project (1936-1939)

Digital ID: cph 3f05383 Source: color film copy slide

 
 

 

Hull House Community Workshop

Poster for Art classes at Hull House, Illinois.

Published: WPA Federal Art Project (1936-1939)

Digital ID: cph 3f05215 Source: color film copy slide

 
 
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Textlile Clipart Books

Japanese Border Designs CD-ROM and Book (Electronic Clip Art)
Chains, vines, florals, bamboo, lanterns, ships, calligraphy, feathers, fans, yang and yin, lutes, tortoises, and more.
UK: Japanese Border Designs

Arabic Designs CD-ROM and Book (Electronic Clip Art)
Centuries-old Arabic designs, with florals from ancient Persian fabrics, geometric figures from Iranian tiles,
UK: Arabic Designs

..more Textile Clipart books..

More Clipart

Page 1: Drop Spindles, buttons

Page 2: Dye vats, Mechanical looms

Page 3: Clipart- Silk Moths

Page 4: Clipart -Yarn balls, cotton bolls

Page 5: Clipart -Tapestry weavers

Page 6: Clipart – WPA posters

Page 7: Clipart – Weaver at a loom

Page 8: Clipart – Weaving room, Distaff Wheel

Page 9: Clipart – Icelandic Spinning Wheel

Page 10: Clipart – Silk Reeling, Cotton Gin

Page 11: Clipart – Flax Retting

Page 12: Clipart – Lowell Mill Girls

Page 13: Clipart – Salish Woman – Emily Carr

Page 14: Clipart – Backstrap Loom

Page 15: Clipart – Spanish Woman Carding Wool

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Weaving – Hemp Rep Weave Placemats: aa111202

Warp-face Rep weave (ripsmatta, ripsi) is a weave structure that uses 2 weights of weft yarn, a thick and a thin yarn, woven in tabby, to create a horizontal ribbed design. In a true warp-faced rep, the warp is sett very closely. When woven, the entire weft is covered.

hemp placemat

In these hemp placemats, I have used a looser sett, allowing the thick weft to show through. This adds an additional design element to the placemats. The placemats are woven using 2 coloured yarns, alternating in the threading. When woven in tabby, this creates a reversible placemat of different colours.

rep weave

Warp

  • Colour 1: 100 grams 720 ypp 3 ply dyed hemp (Red)
  • Colour 2: 200 grams 720 ypp 3 ply dyed hemp (Burgundy)
  • Natural: 100 grams 1500 ypp 3 ply natural hemp

Warp Length: 4 yd
No. Ends: 150
Sett: 10 epi

Border

The borders on the placemats are approx. 2 inches in width. Use Colour 1 & Colour 2 alternating in the threading.

Threading:
Colour 1 – 10 ends (Red)
Colour 2 – 10 ends (Burgundy)

Center

The warp for the Center of the placemats uses Colour 2 and a natural hemp yarn.

Threading:
Colour 2 – 54 ends
Natural – 54 ends

Weft

For the thick weft, you can use a thick cotton mop yarn. Or you can combine several 8/2 cotton or cotton chenille yarns together. These can all be the same colour, or for different colour effects, try mixing several different colours. For the thin weft, use either 1 strand of 8/2 cotton or 20/2 cottolin.

Weave in Tabby with 2 shuttles, alternating between thick and thin wefts, to create a ribbed weave effect.

Finishing

Cut the finished warp from the loom and zig-zag stitch the ends to prevent fraying. Wash in warm water and machine dry.

Iron the warp and then cut the placemats to 18″ lengths. Sew bias tape to finish the edges.

Weaving Patterns

Hemp Rep Placemats
Linen Towels
Hemp Towels
Hot Tub Towels

Linen Weaving Books

Linen from flax seed to woven cloth
Learn about flax cultivation, processing and spinning, natural and synthetic dyeing, and weaving and finishing linen cloth.
UK: Linen from flax seed..

How to weave linens
UK: How to Weave Linens

Reflections From A Flaxen Past : For Love of Lithuanian Weaving
Flax tools and faces from archival photographs; textile images and patterns.
UK: Reflections from a Flaxen Past

..More Weaving Books…

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Book Store: Handweaving books

Handweaving Pattern books for the beginner and more advanced weaver.

countermarche

Intrecci
A photo gallery of handwoven textiles.

Weaving for Beginners: An Illustrated Guide (Peggy Osterkamp’s New Guide to Weaving Series)
Provides beginners with the information they need to weave in a clear and enjoyable step-by-step way.
UK: Weaving for Beginners

The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory
Introduction to the tools, equipment, fibers, and yarns used with four-shaft looms, this reference features patterns for 600 different weaves, including twill, zigzag, diamond, herringbone, and block
UK: Handweavers Pattern Directory

The Weaver’s Book of 8-Shaft Patterns
A thousand different patterns on more than 25 weave structures.
UK: 8 Shaft Patterns

The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Information on looms, yarn, methods of warping, drafting, troubleshooting, planning, and fabric finishing.
UK: Weavers Companion

A Handweaver’s Pattern Book
A collection of 377 patterns for four-harness weaving, organized in groups of similar designs. This is one of the first weaving books I bought and it is still one of my favourites.
UK: Handweavers Pattern Book

The Magic of Handweaving
About the art of hand weaving, including the history and heritage of this timeless art, how looms work, what tools and equipment to use, the basics of good technique.
UK: Magic of Handweaving

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials
This book covers basic subjects such as warping a loom and making bobbins of weft, as well as more elaborate, highly decorative projects: baby blankets, shawls, table cloths, and linen hand towels.
UK: Big Book of Weaving

The Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving
Complete pattern drafts for rugs, curtain, table cloths, towels, bedspreads.
UK: Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving

Hand Weaving Patterns From Finland
UK: Handweaving Patterns from Finland

Keep Me Warm One Night: Early Handweaving in Eastern Canada
Coverlets & other items, including clothing, primarily of the 19th Century.
UK: Keep Me Warm

Manual Of Swedish Handweaving
A comprehensive book on handweaving in general which draws on the Swedish handweaving tradition, looms, charts, diagrams, weave composition patterns, technical drawings.
UK: Manual Of Swedish Handweaving

Swedish Handweaving
180 handweaving patterns for pillows, curtains, blankets, rugs: 4 harness twills, honeycomb, lace, rosepath, extended point twills, damask.
UK: Swedish Handweaving

The Weaver’s Book: Fundamentals of Handweaving
UK: Fundamentals of Handweaving

Key to Weaving: A Textbook of Hand-Weaving Techniques and Pattern Drafts for the Beginning Weaver
A definitive guide to handloom weaving: step-by-step instructions, intricacies of color, fiber and how to use them effectively.
UK: Key to Weaving

Weaving For Worship Handweaving for Churches and Synagogues
UK: Weaving for Worship

Jacquard’s Web: How a Hand-Loom Led to the Birth of the Information Age
From the Industrial Age to the Information Age, connecting the loom to thefirst proper computer.
UK: Jacquards Web

Women’s Work: The First 20,000 Years: Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times
New discoveries about the textile arts reveal women’s unexpectedly influential role in ancient societies.
Twenty thousand years ago, women were making and wearing the first clothing created from spun fibers. In fact, right up to the Industrial Revolution the fiber arts were an enormous economic force, belonging primarily to women.

Mastering Weave Structures
How to design threadings, channel the design power of the tie-up, and make the most of threading options, as well as understand fibers, setts, and color interactions.
UK: Mastering Weave Structures

Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave: 45 Stylish Designs for the Modern Home
A collection of 45 different furnishing textiles: colorful blankets, fanciful table runners, classic curtains, and embroidered hand towels.
UK: Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave

Rug Weaving Techniques: Beyond the Basics
Concise instructions and explanatory diagrams techniques for plain weave, twill and block weaves.
UK: Rug Weaving Techniques

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy

The Weaver’s Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom
Techniques include leno, Brooks bouquet, soumak, and embroidery on fabric.
UK: Weavers Idea Book

Collapse Weave: Creating Three-Dimensional Cloth
Collapse cloth when removed from the loom and washed, takes on an entirely different appearance as the threads draw up and create puckers.
UK: Collapse Weave

The Weaver’s Studio: Doubleweave
How to weave a tube, and a tube within a tube.
UK: Doubleweave

Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving
Wonderful projects and plain-weave variations, this user-friendly guide covers choosing, setting up, and weaving on a rigid heddle loom.
UK: Hands on Rigid Heddle

The Woven Bag: 30+ Projects from Small Looms (Writers Digest Guides)
Each bag is created using small looms, such as potholder looms, frame looms and knotted mesh looms.
UK: The Woven Bag

Linen Weaving

Linen from flax seed to woven cloth
Learn about flax cultivation, processing and spinning, natural and synthetic dyeing, and weaving and finishing linen cloth.
UK: Linen from flax seed..

How to weave linens
UK: How to Weave Linens

Reflections From A Flaxen Past : For Love of Lithuanian Weaving
Flax tools and faces from archival photographs; textile images and patterns.
UK: Reflections from a Flaxen Past

Rug Weaving Books

Making Rag Rugs: 15 Step-by-Step Projects
Step-by-step instructions for 15 rugs that are hooked, prodded, clipped, or braided.
UK: Making Rag Rugs

The Rag Rug Handbook
Rag rugs from basic information to drafts for 20 traditional two- and four-shaft patterns.
UK:Rag Rug Handbook

The Braided Rug Book: Creating Your Own American Folk Art
The classic guide to an enduring American craft – Beginners will learn about wools and other materials, how to care for finished rugs, and how to recognize a quality rug.
UK: Braided Rug Book

Twined Rag Rugs: Tradition in the Making
Twining done with rag strips is an effective technique for making sturdy objects like rugs, bath mats, baskets, and bags.
UK: Twined Rag Rugs

Weaving Videos

Warping the Loom Back to Front – A DVD Workshop with Peggy Osterkamp
This workshop thoroughly explores the process of dressing a loom by yourself, from back to front.
UK: Warping the Loom

Weaving Lace

Huck Lace: The Best of Weaver’s (Best of Weaver’s series)
A variety of drafts for weaving huck lace.

LACE AND LACEY WEAVES: A compilation of 86 Lace & Lacey Weave projects with complete worksheets. Revised.

Handwoven Laces
Hand weavers can use a loom to quickly produce lovely lacy fabrics. The loom-controlled textures depend upon groups of threads that work together and do not reveal their full effect until the cloth comes off the loom.

A Joy Forever: Latvian Weaving: Traditional and Modified Uses
Historic Latvian household textiles along with contemporary projects that adapt traditional weave structures to the creation of linens, coverlets, and rugs

Silk Textile Books

The Silk Weavers of Kyoto: Family and Work in a Changing Traditional Industry
The makers of obi, the elegant and costly sash worn over kimono in Japan, belong to an endangered species. Tamara Hareven integrates historical research with intensive life history interviews to reveal the relationships among family, work, and community in this highly specialized occupation.
UK: Silk Weavers of Kyoto

Silk Paper: A Guide To Making It And Using It In Textile Art
the basic methods for creating silk paper in step-by-step detail to create flat and 3D designs, from framed pieces to jewelry.
UK: Silk Paper

The Book of Silk
Following the Silk Road from China and Japan through Asia into Europe, the story is as variegated as the rich colors, weaves, and embroideries that were used for the ceremonial or everyday accoutrements of the wealthy and powerful.
UK:Book of Silk

Weaving and Dye Books

Woven Shibori (The Weaver’s Studio series)
Unlike traditional shibori, which uses stitches placed by needle on commercial cloth in the dyeing process, the “stitches” used in this new process are woven directly into the cloth, thus becoming part of the cloth’s construction.
UK: Woven Shibori

Weaving Books: Kindle

Small Loom & Freeform Weaving
Kindle version
Included are 30 small weaving projects, some of which can easily be completed in an evening or weekend.
UK: Small Loom and Freeform Weaving
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Weaving Draft – Summer Winter: aa032701

Summer and Winter is a very versatile draft. This project uses 8/2 cotton yarn for making reversible placemats.

summer winter placemat

Summer Winter Placemat Pattern

Warp 8/2 Cotton Length 3 yd Sett 18 epi No. Ends 256 Finished Width 12″ Finished Length
Including Fringe 19″

Threading

The Summer/Winter draft was threaded in Blocks as shown below.

Summer Winter Weaving Draft

Summer/Winter Pattern Draft

Block # Repeats # Ends
A 6 24
B 5 20
A 8 32
B 8 32
A 10 40
B 8 32
A 8 32
B 5 20
A 6 24
Total 256

Treadling

I wove these placemats as a sampler, varying the treadling between Singles and Pairs.

Finishing

Each placemat was woven to a length of 18″ on the loom. Handfinishing was done on the loom using Hemstitch finish. Between each placemat, the warp was advanced 2 inches, to allow a fringe.

After weaving, I cut the warp from the loom, and put it through a wash and dry
cycle in my washer. After washing, I ironed the placemats and trimmed the fringes.

Variation: Chenille Towels

handwoven chenille towels

Instead of using 8/2 cotton for the weft, you can also try using cotton chenille. In this sample I wove 1450 ypp cotton chenille for the pattern shots of the draft alternating with 8/2 cotton for the tabby shots. I think that this combination would be nice for bath towels.

Summer/Winter Draft

Weaving Patterns

Hemp Rep Weave Placemats
Twill Tabby Towels

Hand Weaving Books: Weaving Projects

Mastering Weave Structures
How to design threadings, channel the design power of the tie-up, and make the most of threading options, as well as understand fibers, setts, and color interactions.
UK: Mastering Weave Structures

Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave: 45 Stylish Designs for the Modern Home
A collection of 45 different furnishing textiles: colorful blankets, fanciful table runners, classic curtains, and embroidered hand towels.
UK: Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave

The Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving
Complete pattern drafts for rugs, curtain, table cloths, towels, bedspreads.
UK: Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials
This book covers basic subjects such as warping a loom and making bobbins of weft, as well as more elaborate, highly decorative projects: baby blankets, shawls, table cloths, and linen hand towels.
UK: Big Book of Weaving

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Weaving Project – Mirror Warp: aa021201

Mirror warping and overdyeing is a great way to use up leftover yarns to weave a scarf or a throw.

For this throw project, you can search through your yarn stash for all your odd colours of yarns, that you don’t know what to do with. Try to use yarns of similar weights and fibre types. Such as all wools, or cottons. The colours don’t have to be co-ordinated, because you will be overdyeing them, so colour clashes are great for this project.

 

Mirror Warp Throw

Mirror Warp

When weaving a mirror warp, your warp should be twice as long and half as wide as a normal warp and you will need to put a Cross at BOTH ENDS of the warp. When threading the warp to the loom, you will fold the warp in half and thread both ends of the warp onto the loom, creating a mirror image of the warp.
mirror warp diagram

Mirror Warp Throw Pattern

To weave a standard wool throw, I use the following measurements:

Warp Yarn: 2 ply fine wool
(Briggs & Little)

Sett: 8 epi

Width in Reed: 45″

No. Ends: 8 x 45 = 360 Ends

Warp length: 3 yards

To convert this to a Mirror Warp:

Sett: 8 epi

Width in Reed: 45″

No. Ends: 360/2 = 180 Ends

Warp Length: 3 x 2 = 6 yards

Wind all of the warp on the warping board or mill.

Overdyed Warp

If you are overdyeing the warp, Tie the crosses loosely but securely. Also add additional ties to the warp chains at one yard intervals. Remember to put crosses at both ends of the warp. You will be overdyeing the whole warp, so make sure that the ties are secure but loose.
Once the dyed warp has dried, you can now thread your loom.

Weaving Projects and Techniques

Tapestry Pillows
Double Width Weaving
Finnweave
Leno Lace Pickup
Doubleweave Pickup
Clasped Weft

Weaving Books: Patterns and Projects

The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials
This book covers basic subjects such as warping a loom and making bobbins of weft, as well as more elaborate, highly decorative projects: baby blankets, shawls, table cloths, and linen hand towels.
UK: Big Book of Weaving

The Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving
Complete pattern drafts for rugs, curtain, table cloths, towels, bedspreads.
UK: Treasure Chest of Swedish Weaving

Key to Weaving: A Textbook of Hand-Weaving Techniques and Pattern Drafts for the Beginning Weaver
A definitive guide to handloom weaving: step-by-step instructions, intricacies of color, fiber and how to use them effectively.
UK: Key to Weaving

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