Tag Archives: hand spinning

Charkha Spinning: charkha

Charkha Mailing List
A special mailing list for those interested in Charka spinning, run by listmom Teri Pittman.

Darjeeling Woman
A photo of a Darjeeling woman spinning on a charkha.

Epigrams – Charkha
I believe that the yarn we spin is capable of mending the broken warp and woof of our life. Epigrams and quotations from Mahatma Gandhi.

Literally, it means “spinning wheel”. It was the only machine Gandhi liked; everybody could use it, it was inexpensive, and it did not turn the user into its slave.

Gandhi lived his life as an example for the world to follow. The charkha was his tool

“But why spin every day? Is it not enough if we spin now and then for the cloth we need? But then, this would only be a worldly or secular activity. Spinning daily is spiritual; it indicates an inner desire to do what we can for our country. The thread we spin binds us day by day…”

Setting Up a Charkha
How to put a book style charkha together.

Handspinning Information

Drop Spindles and Spinning Wheels

Handspinning Books: Spindle Spinning

Productive Spindling
A look at top whorl, bottom whorl and Turkish spindle methods to boost your techniques for efficiency and make productivity fun
UK: Productive Spindling

Spinning in the Old Way
UK: Spinning in the Old Way

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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$179.95
End Date: Saturday Sep-7-2019 17:09:43 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $179.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Charkha book style spinning wheel

$130.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-3-2019 18:56:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $130.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Handspun Merino Socks: aa120199

handspun socks

These socks are easy to spin and are a great project for using leftover bits of fiber from your stash. I used about 6 ounces of merino top, in 3 colors – peach, royal blue and tartan green.
roving

merino roving

I chose to do the color blending at the wheel, in order to create the definite sections of color. Carding the fibers together would have produced a more heathered type of yarn. To spin, I pulled a 6 inch length from each of the sections of roving, and held them together in my left hand. I then spun from this hank, working back and forth, allowing the colors blend randomly.
handspinning

handspinning closeup

I used the largest whorl on my spinning wheel – a Louet S87 Saxony – as my spinning tends to overtwist a bit. To reduce the diameter of the spun yarn, I use the hooks on the flyer and lace the yarn before threading it through the orifice.

spinning wheel

After spinning, I plied the singles together to produce a 2 ply yarn. The finished skeins were then washed and fulled. I filled a sink with hot water and a bit of dishwashing detergent. I placed the skeins into the hot water, and used a potato masher to give them a good beating. The skeins were then rinsed in cold water. This treatment seems a bit rough, but it sets the twist of the yarn and allows the wool fibers to open and fluff up a bit, creating a more pleasing yarn that is now ready to be knit.
fulling yarn

handspun yarn

The socks are great, but now I have to make more for the other feet in the family.

Knitted Sock Patterns

Sock Knitting Pattern Books

Sock Knitting Master Class: Innovative Techniques + Patterns from Top Designers
With patterns divided into two sections by top-down and toe-up construction, Sock Knitting Master Class explores such techniques as cables, twisted stitches, lace, stranded colorwork, entrelac, shadow knitting, and intarsia worked in the round.
UK: Sock Knitting Master Class

Getting Started Knitting Socks (Getting Started series)
From cast-on stitches to binding off, this handbook details the simple steps needed to turn complicated sock knitting projects into enjoyable activities.
UK: Getting Started Knitting Socks

..more Sock Knitting Pattern Books..
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ANTIQUE Reed Company Little Dandy Loom -  Weaving Rug Loom

$500.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Aug-25-2019 11:13:25 PDT
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Electric bobbin winder, weaving loom

$148.00
End Date: Thursday Sep-5-2019 20:50:51 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $148.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

KINGFISHER II TAPESTRY LOOM

$215.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-10-2019 6:25:50 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $215.00
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Spider Silk : aa103099

spider

Have you ever watched a spider spin and marveled at how this little creature can spin such
an amazing web. Have you wondered if you could use and spin its fiber?
Spider silk has incredible tensile strength and elasticity. Per unit weight, spider silk is
stronger than steel. Spider silk is being developed for some unique applications, such as
bulletproof vests, and surgical procedures.

spider web
Photo by R. Lane

Spider Men Weave Silken Tapestry
Simon Peers and Nicolas Godley spent 4 years collecting spider silk to weave a tapestry.
As It Happens – CBC Radio
An interview with Nicolas Godley, who milked the spiders and wove the tapestry.
Researchers at the
University of BC have found that spiders produce up to seven types of silk. Paul Guerette
describes the mechanical properties of orb-web building spiders that range from Kevlar-like to
rubber-like elastomeric fibers.Each gland of the spider produces a different type of silk,
some become dry outside of the body, while others remain sticky.

Danish scientist, Fritz Vollrath (Discover, October, 1998) a zoologist at the University of
Araneus has discovered that a spider uses a method of processing its fiber that is similar to
that of manufacturing industrial fibers such as nylon. The silk is hardened by acidifying.

Spider Sutures
Spider silk may one day be used by surgeons as sutures for stitching up wounds.

Forbes.com: Charlotte’s Goat
an article that describes an experiment where Nigerian dwarf goats are synthesizing spider silk
in their mammmary glands.

Spider Silk
More interesting facts about this incredible material and some closeup pictures of spider silk
strands.

Mutant Silk Worms
By inserting specific spider genes into silkworm chromosomes, silkworm of caterpillars have been grown that produce threads nearly as strong as spider silk.

Golden Spider Silk Fabric
The V&A had a display of the world’s largest pieces of fabric made from spider silk

Biosteel Yarn

Scientists Weave Spider Silk Into New Bulletproof Vests.: An article from: National Defense
This digital document is an article from National Defense, published by National Defense Industrial Association.
UK: Scientists Weave Spider Silk

Spider Silk: Evolution and 400 Million Years of Spinning, Waiting, Snagging, and Mating
Brunetta and Craig tell the intriguing story of how spiders evolved over 400 million years to add new silks and new uses for silk to their survival “toolkit” taking readers far beyond the orb.
UK: Spider Silk

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Hallowe’en Crafts and Patterns

Hallowe’en Beadwork

Hallowe’en Clipart

Hallowe’en Crochet

Hallowe’en Cross Stitch

Hallowe’en Feltmaking

Hallowe’en Knitting

Arachne
The Greek goddess Arachne was turned into a spider.

Handspinning books

The Intentional Spinner
Offering a blend of technical knowledge, history, and easy-to-use tips, this inspiring collection of spinning wisdom deftly explores the three fundamental areas of yarn production: understanding fibers, managing yarn structure, and making yarns that precisely meet the spinner’s needs.
UK: Intentional Spinner

Teach Yourself Visually Handspinning (Teach Yourself Visually Consumer)
This visual guide shows you the basics, beginning with the tools and fibers, and takes you through spinning, plying, making novelty yarns, using exotic fibers, dyeing, and more.
UK: Teach Yourself Visually Handspinning

..more books about Handspinning..

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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$179.95
End Date: Saturday Sep-7-2019 17:09:43 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $179.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Charkha book style spinning wheel

$130.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-3-2019 18:56:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $130.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Handspinning – Woollen and Worsted: aa091599

Several years ago, I had the great fortune to learn to spin. I took an intensive 12 week Handspinning course, taught by Judith MacKenzie, through the Kootenay School of the Arts. We learned how to sort a fleece, spin in the grease, and wash the fleece. Wool-combing, carding, blending roving to create heathered tones are all techniques that create different types of yarns. Spinning from quality top and luxury yarns, mohairs, angora, cashmere all added to the range of gourmet yarn creation. Judith now teaches workshops throughout the U.S. If you ever have an opportunity to take one of her classes, do so. I’m sure you will enjoy it.

One of the first things I learned is that wool yarns can be classified into 2 main categories, worsted and woollen. Worsted yarns are smooth, quite strong and long-wearing. They are used for woven clothing such as men’s suits. A true worsted yarn is spun from the longer fibers of the fleece. The fiber is usually combed with wool combs. This removes the shorter fibers and bits of dirt that may be in the fiber. Combing keeps the longer fibers in parallel order. The shorter fibers can be used to spin a woollen yarn. Commercially prepared top can also be used for worsted spinning, when you don’t want to do all the prep work yourself.
worsted handspinning

Worsted Spinning

To spin a worsted yarn, the spinning technique is quite controlled. If you are drafting with your right hand, pinch the thumb and forefinger of your right hand together to control the twist. Do not let the twist travel past the drafting triangle. If you are having trouble and the twist is traveling past your hand and making a nasty lump in your yarn, slow your wheel down a bit by loosening the tension on the bobbin slightly.

Shetland Top – Worsted Spinning

Woollen Spinning

Woollen spun yarns are loftier and softer. The fiber is shorter and is usually carded rather than combed. This results in fibers that go in different directions rather than parallel, incorporating more air into the yarn. Woollen yarns are more suitable for knitting, sweaters or fluffy blankets.

You Tube – Woolen Long Draw Spinning

More about Wool Yarns

  • Wool Processing
    The Sheep USA site describes the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of wool.
  • Coldharbour Mill
    The Coldharbour Mill has been spinning both wool and worsted yarns for nearly 200 years.
  • Turn Wolf Fur into Yarn
    Jerilyn Monroe tells how she turned her dog’s fur into yarn using a drop spindle (woollen spun, I think)
  • Spinners Guild Glossary
    An SCA glossary of spinning terms.

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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$179.95
End Date: Saturday Sep-7-2019 17:09:43 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $179.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Charkha book style spinning wheel

$130.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-3-2019 18:56:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $130.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Wooly dogs: bl-wooldogs

Woolly Dogs
by Elizabeth Flower Anderson Miller

I have been studying since 1987, the wool dog or woolly dog, grown for at least 700 years, possibly 2500 years, by the First Nations or Native American peoples in the areas now western British Columbia and western Washington. I just presented at a conference at the Sto:lo nation in B.C. what I knew about the dog grown by their ancestors, including information I gathered from spinners on this forum.

Also, I am interested in hearing from anyone who has spun American Eskimo dog hair, or owners or breeders of Eskies about that dog’s hair, especially if they have a dog with the recessive genes that caus the soft insulating hair to be longer than the guard hairs.

Wool dogs, (woolly dogs, or wooly dogs,) were bred in at least four places in the Americas prior to contact. The four area dogs may have been distinctly different breeds with heavy loads of long hair in common or there could have been some contact and exchange. Their heavy, easily matted, easily spun long hair provided fiber to weave many items in the Pre Columbian Mexican areas, for belts and tumpline weavings. In South America somewhere east of the Peruvian Andes, small two bar looms produced belts and tumplines. In the Four Corners area of the southwest U.S.A., dog wool was manufactured into many of the products later surplanted by sheep’s wool.

But the unique breed of woolly dogs was used most extensively for its fur fiber, to weave the famous and now rare “Salish” blankets, in the Northwest Pacific Coast area of North America, along the inland coastal and rivers of what is now Washington State and British Columbia.

Found in a Millikan, B.C., archaeological site, a stone spindle whorl, more than 700 years old, bears the likenesses of two dogs. Sites up to 4500 years ago may be evidence of the weaving, but I haven’t yet seen the actual reports from those digs in British Columbia.

The Salish, Nootkan, and nearby peoples who used the dogs have many ancient stories about the dogs and blankets, and the stories are intricately woven into the fabric of their cultures. Many of their artifacts bear the likenesses of dogs.

Blankets were prized items in the rich, pre contact, potlatch distribution economic system, along with slaves. At one point, eight blankets could buy a slave. When the longhouse ‘chief’ had visitors, hundreds of blankets were piled along the roofs to show off the prestige of a man who could command such skill among his extended family. The shortage of fiber from dogs and the popularity of blankets led to the use of mountain goat fur, nettle and Indian hemp fibers, milkweed pod, and cottonwood fluff, feathers, cedar twine, and other materials to extend the supply of yarn.

The dogs were kept in little flocks of about 12 to 20 animals, fed raw salmon and parts of salmon, dried, smoked,and leftover cooked salmon. Sometimes elk tallow and liver were added to the diet to make the coat shine. To keep the breed true to type and the preferred white color, the wool dogs were separated from other dogs, confined on islands, in fenced pits, or gated caves, to be especially bred during their once a year estrus. The dogs were shorn of their long, thick fur in May or June. The shorn wool was so thick that Captain Vancouver could pick up a corner and the whole pelt would hold together.

The fur was washed, then cleaned by beating diatomaceous earth or kaolin type white clays, to full it, very much like was done to sheep fleeces of England. (White Cliffs of Dover type material) It was carded possibly by using the finely made wooden combs. I haven’t seen evidence that teazles were pre contact, though certainly of use had they been.

The dog wool (and any additional material) was spun off of a 3 or 4 foot stick with a spindle whorl attached partway down. The short end of the stick held the cleaned and carded wool. The long end of the stick was rubbed across across the thigh, into a fine yarn which was doubled and twisted into a two ply yarn, with the yarn being pulled from the center of the ball for weaving.

A number of natural dyes and mordants were used to color the wool–among them Oregon grape root for a bright yellow green; blue and greenish clays for those colors, a liverwort from the large leafed maple for a ‘real good brown.’ An orange-red lichen traded or fetched from the basalt cliffs along the Columbia provided a reddish color. Women’s dying parties, to share the dyes and the equipment, persisted into the time sheep’s wool was used.

The ‘Salish’ blankets, were usually woven on a four or five foot high two bar loom, sometimes leaned against a wall, where the warp was looped around the upper and lower bar. The blanket could be rolled around to the area convenient to being worked. A cedar basket stich where the yarn was wrapped around each warp, or a twill weave often formed the weft. The blankets were usually finished at the ends with a fringe from the cut ends of the warp or somtimes from the extra length of weft on each side. Stripes, zigzags, plaids, and little patch shapes were woven into handsome patterns.

In many longhouses, only the noble people could own the dogs or the weaving tools. Sometimes only the men, sometimes both men and women could own them. At an owner’s death, the equipment was sometimes burned. The weaving was done by women of the extended families, and only ones that were allowed the privilege could learn the skill, though perhaps already skilled captured slaves were employed in some cases.

But when the fur trade began, in the 1850’s, the Hudson Bay Company blankets, made of the warmer and more waterproof sheeps’ wool, became very popular. Sheep were introduced within a few years, as well. One old lady whose high class mother was a skilled weaver, sniffed,in 1989, “Oh, you mean poor men’s blankets.” Her mother used sheep’s wool when Jean Fish was little.

Along with the economic disincentive to keep the animals, the decimation of the indiginous population by plague after plague (of smallpox, influenza, and other diseases,)the breakup of the cultural patterns, including the legal prohibition on the potlatch, and, very probably, introduced diseases and parasites wiping out the dogs, the dogs became rare. They were evidently house dogs, unable to care for themselves. The last one I heard of, owned by a Skodomish man, died in 1940.

Sadly, the unique blankets have nearly vanished, with only a few dozen left, scattered across the world. Several attempts at reintroducing the weaving have sputtered out, partly because the grants which support the effort have been for only one year, and the skill and reintroduction of the weaving tool crafts take longer than that.

My own research notes finds that the dogs were not grown very far north of Vancouver Island. I believe the dogs may have carried the “Malamute” factor, where a set of recessive genes cause the underfur to grow much longer and thicker than the guard hairs. This is a lethal flaw in the arctic for ice, mud, and snow cling tenaciously to the insulating fur, while normal dogs’ guard hairs usually shake off the snow, mud, and ice in just a few moments. The factor would certainly add to the spinability of the fur.

Also, few or no wool dogs, nor other dogs–bear dogs, burden bearing dogs, hunting dogs, curs, were not found along the western– most coasts and up the rivers spilling into the Pacific Ocean. The reason is those coasts and river areas are home to a snail that is one of the tri-vector hosts of a parasite, whose other vectors are mammals (like otters and muscrats)and salmon. Eating raw salmon, the primary food used for the dogs, if infected with the parasite, causes a 90% or more death rate, though dogs that recover are afterwards immune.

A picture of the woolly dog in the arms of two Salish looking girls, recently discovered, and in the Chilliwack Museum archives, a J.O.Booen glass plate negative, made 1895-1897, shows a dog very like the many dog-like artifacts, and also much like a spitz type dog of a terrier or Alaskan Eskimo dog traits. This possibility needs to be traced. The very heavy matted hair, the nose, the stop, and the general size and shape of the dog, the suggestion of a chin, the wideset ears all fit into the several descriptions of the dog. This is a very exciting find. The museum has a modest base cost for the print which may be copied for non-commercial use, but a $15 charge for reprint in newspapers, magazines, and books.

I, too, will give permission to use, if for tribal or band non commercial educational purposes, but others please ask permission to copy this work. I have available, a nearly complete bibliography of sources as well, and a publication which may be bought for museums, libraries and others.

copyright 2001, Elizabeth Flower Anderson Miller

Weaving Salish Blankets

Books: Salish

Salish Weaving
The Salish were known as the weavers of the Pacific Northwest. They used the materials around them, hair from mountain goats, and fibers from native plants such as Indian hemp and stinging nettle.
UK: Salish Weaving

Coast Salish: Coast Salish governments, Coast Salish peoples, Cowichan knitting, Salish weaving, Squamish Nation, Douglas Treaties
Coast Salish refers to a cultural or ethnographic designation of a subgroup of the First Nations in British Columbia, Canada and Native American cultures in Washington, and Oregon in the United States who speak one of the Coast Salish languages.
UK: Coast Salish

Contemporary Coast Salish Art
By carving, weaving, and painting their stories into ceremonial and utilitarian objects, Coast Salish artists render tangible the words and ideas that have been the architecture of this remarkable Pacific Northwest Coast culture steeped in the ritual and beauty of storytelling and mythology.
UK: Contemporary Coast Salish Art

S’abadeb, The Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists
Sculpture in wood, stone, and bone – including monumental house posts – as well as expertly crafted basketry, woven regalia, and works in glass, print media, and painting showcase a sweeping artistic tradition and its contemporary vibrant manifestations.
UK: S’abadeb, The Gifts

more Coast Salish books..

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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$179.95
End Date: Saturday Sep-7-2019 17:09:43 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $179.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Charkha book style spinning wheel

$130.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-3-2019 18:56:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $130.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Qiviut: aa011099

Qiviut is a rare, incredibly soft and light-weight fiber. Qiviut is from the Inuit language, meaning the underwool of the Musk Ox or Oomingmak. There are several spellings of the word: qivitit, kiviuk, qiviuk, qiviute, qiveut, to name a few.

Musk Ox are found on the high arctic tundra in northern Canada and Greenland. They have been reintroduced to Russia and Norway. Musk ox in the wild are nomadic and travel about 1 mile per day between feeding areas. They migrate between moist lowlands in summer and high, barren plateaus in winter. To guard their young, musk ox travel in rings, the adults surrounding the young, protecting them from wolves and other attackers. Their diet consists of flowering plants, leaves and shrubs.

There are also a few domestic and research herds in Alaska, Canada and Montana.

Musk Ox grow 400 – 800 lbs. They have a long outer coat comprised of coarse guard hairs. Their inner downy coat allows them to survive the cold arctic winter. Qiviut is 8 times warmer than wool and is finer than cashmere. Qiviut doesn’t have natural elasticity like wool, and doesn’t shrink or felt and takes dye beautifully.

Musk ox shed their fiber once a year, yielding about 5 to 7 lbs. of fiber. Qiviut fiber collection, cleaning and dehairing is a very time consuming process as it is all done by hand. The yarn is spun in specialized cashmere factories. For handspinners, Silvia Becker offers advice on spinning qiviut.

The Musk Ox Company in Montana sells fiber and yarn for knitters. The yarns are available in several fashionable colors and patterns.

More about Qiviut

Exotic Yarns

Are you looking for some qiviut to spin? Here are links to some suppliers of exotic yarns.

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ANTIQUE Reed Company Little Dandy Loom -  Weaving Rug Loom

$500.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Aug-25-2019 11:13:25 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

Electric bobbin winder, weaving loom

$148.00
End Date: Thursday Sep-5-2019 20:50:51 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $148.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

KINGFISHER II TAPESTRY LOOM

$215.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-10-2019 6:25:50 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $215.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Spinning Fibre Information: fibreinfo

Fiber Characteristics
FabricLink lists characteristics and end uses of natural and synthetic fibres such as: acetates, cotton, lyocell, linen, mohair and microfibres.

Electron Microsopic Images
Images of wool, linen, cotton, silk and rayon as seen through an electron microscope.

Fiber Identification using Burning Behavior
A table of how fibre behaves in an open flame.

Flammability of Textile Fibers
Which fibres are quick to ignite, self-extinguish or melt? Good to know, when you are planning your project.

Identification of the Fiber
Burn tests, chemical tests, and fibre precautions, from Core Company — a company specializing in carpet care.

Manufacturing Process for Spun Yarns
The Texguide site shows the conversion process of changing fibre in yarn.

A Prickly Question
Mike Safley discusses the “prickle factor” in determining whether a garment will be itchy.

The Spinster, the Weaver, the Whole Wooly World
This site describes fibre preparation and spinning by Mormon pioneers.

Suggestions for National Spinning and Weaving Week
The HGA, offers suggestions to make spinning more visible in your community.

Yarn Sizes
Esther Bozak has compiled a useful table of common yarn sizes.

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ANTIQUE Reed Company Little Dandy Loom -  Weaving Rug Loom

$500.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Aug-25-2019 11:13:25 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

Electric bobbin winder, weaving loom

$148.00
End Date: Thursday Sep-5-2019 20:50:51 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $148.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

KINGFISHER II TAPESTRY LOOM

$215.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-10-2019 6:25:50 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $215.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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Knitting with Handspun : aa110497

Whether you are a handspinner using your own yarn or an experienced knitter, once you have tried knitting with handspun you may get spoiled. Personally, I find it much more satisfying to knit with handspun than the “perfect” commercial yarns.

Even for the novice knitter, using handspun isn’t difficult. The occasional irregularities of the yarn can hide the less than perfect tension that sometimes occurs.

I find it best to use a 2-ply handspun yarn for knitting. Whenever a yarn is spun as a singles, it has a tendency to try to unspin itself. If knit up as a singles, the yarn will still try to untwist and the garment may stretch or sag. If the yarn has been plyed with another singles (2 ply), the yarns will be untwisting on each other, creating a balanced yarn that should have less of a tendency to stretch out of shape.

Although handspun yarn has some bumps and irregularities, if well spun, it should be of a consistent weight throughout the skein. Knitting with this is similar to knitting with a commercially spun textured yarn.

When choosing a pattern for knitting handspun, it is really important to spin and knit a large test swatch to get an accurate gauge. The needle size or number of stitches may have to be adjusted in the pattern.

For non-spinners who would like to order handspun, but the yarn is too thick or too fine for your project, ask the spinner if another weight is available. Perhaps they can spin a sample for you in 2 or 3 slightly different weights.

Handspun Yarns
If you would like to knit with handspun, but aren’t a spinner, our Subject Library lists some sources for handspun yarns.

Handspun Knitting Projects
A collection of project ideas for using your handspun.

Kool-aid Mittens
Here are some mittens that were dyed with kool-aid and then spun handspun.

Handspun Hats
A free pattern for knitted hats.

Felted Mittens
Try this free pattern with handspun yarns.

Spiral Socks
Knit some spiral socks – no heels to turn.

Knitware Design
This is one of my favourite programs for designing sweaters. It works great for handspun yarns. Just knit a test swatch, type in the gauge, and select the sweater design.

Handspinning Books

The Whole Craft of Spinning: From the Raw Material to the Finished Yarn
Everything you need to know from set-up to finished product in order to create distinctive yarns for use in knitting, weaving, crocheting, needlepoint, embroidery, and macrame.
UK: Whole Craft of Spinning

In Sheep’s Clothing
A comprehensive look at the characteristics of wool of 100 breeds of sheep, this guide gives special attention to fleece characteristics, methods of preparation and spinning, and best end use.
UK: In Sheep’s Clothing

The Knitter’s Book of Wool: The Ultimate Guide to Understanding, Using, and Loving this Most Fabulous Fiber
The vast world of sheep and their wool into the language and context of knitting.
UK: Knitters Book of Wool

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ANTIQUE SPINNING WHEEL / WALNUT / 33” HIGH

$179.95
End Date: Saturday Sep-7-2019 17:09:43 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $179.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Charkha book style spinning wheel

$130.00
End Date: Tuesday Sep-3-2019 18:56:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $130.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

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