Tag Archives: beginner weaving

How to Warp a Loom Front to Back

I find that warping a loom from the Front to the Back, much faster and easier than the traditional method of warping from Back to Front. You don’t need to use a raddle as the reed separates the warp threads evenly across the loom. I use this warping method quite a lot as I often put on shorter warps (5-6) meters and work with wool, linen and cotton threads with setts ranging from 5 to 30 epi.

I do use a Back to Front beaming method and a sectional warp beam if I am weaving with very fine silk threads with +30 epi setts and longer warps (20-30) meters, as these can get tangled while beaming.

You can use the Front to Back warping method on any size of loom – a rigid heddle, or a large floor loom.

Here is how I warp an Ashford Table Loom.

Front to Back Warping 1
Front to Back Warping 1

After you have wound the warp, put 2 lease sticks into the cross, and tie this to the front beam of the table loom.

Front to Back Warping 2
Front to Back Warping 2

Cut the warp ends that are draped over the front beam.

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Front to Back Warping 3
Front to Back Warping 3

Sley the reed – Thread the cut warp ends through the reed to the correct sett. In this project I am threading 2 ends per dent.

Front to Back Warping 4
Front to Back Warping 4
Front to Back Warping 6
Front to Back Warping 5

As you thread the warp ends through the reed, lightly tie them in small groups behind the reed, to secure them while you warp.

Front to Back Warping 7
Front to Back Warping 6

Once all the warp ends have been threaded through the reed, move to the back of the loom.
Following the warping plan, thread the warp ends through the heddles.
I usually work with a group of 4 threads, lacing them through my fingers and thread the next set of 4 heddles.

Front to Back Warping 8
Front to Back Warping 7

Tie the warp ends in small groups to the stick or back apron rod that has been attached to the back warp beam.

Front to Back Warping 9
Front to Back Warping 8

Interweave Books and DVDs
Warping Your Loom DVD
icon

Direct warping rigid-heddle loom/
icon

View from the side of the loom.

Front to Back Warping 10
Front to Back Warping 10

Once all of the warp ends have been threaded and attached to the back apron rod, you are ready to wind the warp onto the back beam.

Front to Back Warping 11
Front to Back Warping 11

If you are beaming the warp by yourself, you will need to move to the front of the loom and straighten out any warp ends.

Front to Back Warping 12
Front to Back Warping 12

Smooth the tangles gently with your fingers. Once the warp has been smoothed out for the next 1/2 meter, move to the back of the loom.

Front to Back Warping 13
Front to Back Warping 13

Move to the back of the loom again, and slowly begin to wind the warp on, checking for any loose threads.

Front to Back Warping 14
Front to Back Warping 14

After every 3/4 turn, insert a piece of cardboard or a stick into the warp. This helps to prevent the warp yarns from slipping in between each other as you roll the warp. This will help to prevent uneven tension as you wind on.

Front to Back Warping 15
Front to Back Warping 15

After you have placed a cardboard strip or a stick, give a tug on the threads evenly across the warp to ensure that the tension is even.

Front to Back Warping 16
Front to Back Warping 16

Every half meter or so, you will need to go to the front of the loom again, to adjust the tension on the warp, and return to the back of the loom to wind on the next section of warp.
Repeat these steps until the warp has been beamed.

Front to Back Loom Warping
Front to Back Loom Warping

Once the warp has been fully wound on, cut the remaining warp ends and tie to the front apron rod.
Check the tension by gently touching the warp with the side of your hand. Adjust and tighten any loose sections.

Congratulations! You are ready to weave!!

It can be quite tricky to wind a warp evenly on a small table loom. The circumference of the back beam is not very big (as in a floor loom) so it takes several revolutions to wind the warp on. The thickness of the warp grows very quickly, so the warp tension is harder to control. If you use paper as a divider, the edges of the warp can easily slip and drop to the sides of the wound warp, creating uneven tension.In this warp, I have used the cardboard strips that came with the Ashford loom. They are a bit better than wrapping with paper, but the cardboard is a bit soft, so creates some bumps in the warp as you are winding – which changes the tension of the warp.

Bamboo Sticks on Warp Beam
Bamboo Sticks on Warp Beam

Using warp sticks is a better alternative because the sticks are rigid so the warp can’t wedge itself between other warp yarns and help hold the tension better.
Extra long bamboo skewers are great for using as a warp separator on small table looms. They are thin and can easily be cut to fit the width of your loom.

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Weaving Books
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Learning to Weave
The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials

Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

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Table Mat Rigid Heddle Weaving Project

I recently purchased a rigid heddle loom to add my loom collection (one loom just isn’t enough). I have always woven on floor looms so to return to weaving on a small table loom is a bit of a learning curve. Although the rigid heddle is a simple design, it can produce some wonderful and creative fabrics. Over the coming weeks, I will be posting some weaving projects and patterns as I weave on this loom.

Ashford Table Looms
Ashford Table Looms

The Ashford 60 cm loom came equipped with a 10 dpi/No. 40 reed. I have ordered an additional reed (15 dpi/No. 60) so that I will be able to use finer yarns. I also ordered 4 pickup sticks so that I will be able to do more than plain tabby weave on this loom.
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For my first project, I decided to put on a 3 meter linen warp so that I can weave multiple sample projects. The 10 dent reed is quite a wide sett so it is suitable for thicker yarns such as handspun or knitting wool yarns.
I purchased my linen yarn for the warp from Finland, but you can substitute with another yarn of a similar weight or thickness or cotton yarn such as seine twine.

Handspun Wool Table Mat Project

Warp Yarn: Linen Yarn Nel 8/2 (Tex 200×2)
Warp Length: 3 Meters
Warp Width: 16 inch, 40 cm
Sett: 10 dpi/No. 40

Weft: Linen Yarn Nel 8/2
Handspun Wool

Project Length: 70 cm

Rigid Heddle Weaving Project
Rigid Heddle Weaving Project

I wove this table mat in a simple tabby weave, using alternating shots of the linen yarn and my handspun wool, creating a thick and thin woven effect. I cut the warp from the loom, hem stitched the edges and cut a 1 inch trim.
Then I fulled the woven piece by washing it in hot water with a bit of dish soap until the wool started to shrink a bit. I rinsed the table mat in cold water and hung to dry.

Handspun Wool and Linen Table Runner
Handspun Wool and Linen Table Runner

Yarn Sources
Lankava Finland

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Rigid Heddle Weaving Books and Supplies

Rigid Heddles for Rigid Heddle Loms 32 Inch By Ashford (10)

Inventive Weaving on a Little Loom: Discover the Full Potential of the Rigid-Heddle Loom, for Beginners and Beyond

Inventive Weaving on a Little Loom: Discover the Full Potential of the Rigid-Heddle Loom, for Beginners and Beyond

The Weaver’s Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom

Weaving Made Easy Revised and Updated: 17 Projects Using a Rigid-Heddle Loom

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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

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Antique Vintage Nilus Leclerc Loom Tension Box Warp Weaving Wood

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Used Nilus LeClerc Table Loom Model MEDICO # S-22-4-73-00

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Replacement heddle: aa072600

Have you ever threaded a warp, started to weave and then discovered that you have made a threading error? in the middle of the warp? Do you undo what you have woven so far, and rethread your loom (muttering a few unspeakable utterances as you do so?)

An alternative to rethreading, especially if the error is near the middle of a +700 end warp is to use replacement heddles, tied to the correct shaft. In this particular example, I have incorrectly threaded a pattern sequence, repeating it once too many times – in the middle, of course.

The offending threads are on Shaft 3 and should be on Shaft 1,that should form a section of tabby between blocks of Bronson Lace.

  • Find the threads that are going to be moved to Shaft 1 from Shaft 3 and mark them with a coloured thread.
  • Cut lengths of strong cotton yarn for the replacement heddles, making them long enough to wrap around the Shafts with allowance for tying.

heddle

 

  • Find the correct location for the replacement heddle on Shaft 1
  • Use the existing heddles as a guide to the correct placement of the eye of the heddle
  • Tie a square knot, aligning it with the bottom edge of the eye of the heddle

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replacement heddle

  • Bring the 2 ends of the new replacement heddle around the warp thread that you are correcting
  • Tie another square knot to form the top part of the heddle eye, aligning it with the top of an existing heddle

  • Bring the 2 ends of the new replacement heddle over the top Shaft and tie securely with a square knot

  • Untie the warp thread that you are fixing, from the front apron
  • Remove it from the reed and from the incorrect heddle on Shaft 3, leaving it threaded on the now corrected Shaft 1
  • Rethread it through the reed and retie to the front apron

How to Weave

Weaving – Beginner Basics
How to Use a McMorran Balance
Table of Setts
Table of Metric Conversions
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Weaving Books
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
The Weaver’s Companion (The Companion Series)
Learning to Weave
The Big Book of Weaving: Handweaving in the Swedish Tradition: Techniques, Patterns, Designs and Materials

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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

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Antique Vintage Nilus Leclerc Loom Tension Box Warp Weaving Wood

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Used Nilus LeClerc Table Loom Model MEDICO # S-22-4-73-00

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Rigid Heddle Looms

Jo posted these pictures and instructions on how to warp a Rigid Heddle loom, to our Forum.
WarpingARigidHeddle1.jpg, 25831 bytes

1. tie the end of your warp to the anchor (at a distance that is the length of the warp you want…..
NOTE: clamp loom to a stable surface….
WarpingARigidHeddle2.jpg, 25774 bytes

2. Sley the slots (only) in the reed – by looping the end of the thread. The slip that loop over the stick attached to the back roller……
WarpingARigidHeddle3.jpg, 25025 bytes

Repeat this till the warp is the width you require…..
wrap around your anchor and then unwind the yarn to the heddle and pull loop of yarn through the next slot and so on……..

WarpingARigidHeddle4.jpg, 18870 bytes

This is what your finished warp will look like…..

WarpingARigidHeddle5.jpg, 35476 bytes

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Another view of finished warp….

WarpingARigidHeddle6.jpg, 14939 bytes

Now it is the time to cut the warp from your anchor…..
It may be best to have someone help you wind the warp as this can help keep even tention and makes it a lot easier for you……..
WarpingARigidHeddle7.jpg, 33807 bytes

I usually put paper between the layers of wound warp on the back beam……
When you get about 1 foot away from the “fixed” heddle (your heddle should be in the “fixed” position throughout warping)….
It is now time to sley the holes…..
take the top thread from the slot, starting on the left and put it in the hole to the right……

WarpingARigidHeddle8.jpg, 33040 bytes

Now it’s time to tie the warp to the front stick that is attched to the front roller/beam…..
Please be sure to tie with even tention…..
Here is what the warped loom looks like…..

WarpingARigidHeddle9.jpg, 30970 bytes

Now it is time to weave……
usually you need to weave what’s called a “heading”…..just a few wefts till the warp is even (notice the taping at the front – you just want to get past this). When you put in a weft thread into the warp angle it up toward the heddle at about 45 degree angle – this will help to prevent the weaving drawing in at the sides…….
WarpingARigidHeddle10.jpg, 26842 bytes

Now beat down that weft – not too hard – if you pack them down too hard your fabric may not drape as nicely.
Finally, always wet finish your piece. I wash my woolen item in the washing mashine with hot water but others prefer warm water or even hand washing – this can be an area to experiment as the wet finish can make or break a piece…..
Happy Weaving !!

Knee Rugs woven on a Rigid Heddle Loom
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Rigid Heddle Weaving

Rigid Heddle Pickup Weaving
Beaivi Rigid Heddle Loom
Double Hole Rigid Heddle
Sami Weaving Drafts

Weaving Books

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy

The Weaver’s Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom
Techniques include leno, Brooks bouquet, soumak, and embroidery on fabric.
UK: Weavers Idea Book

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Cardboard Box Loom: aa041001

A Header is woven at the beginning of a project. This can be woven of any type of scrap yarn as usually the header is removed once the project is finished. Try to use a similar weight of yarn as what will be used in the actual piece. The Header helps to align the warp into place, allows you to check for threading errors and gives a good edge for beating the weft into place.

Weaving the Header

Tabby

Use a knitting needle or a small stick to pick up the warp threads. In Tabby or Plain weave, every other warp thread is picked up, so the weft travels over and under each thread.

Rest the knitting needle on the edge of the box to hold the raised threads in place, while you draw the weft thread through the open shed.

For the next row, pick up the alternate warp threads with the knitting needle and weave the weft thread across.

Weaving Tabby

Arc the Weft

Because the weft thread travels over and under the warp threads, it is necessary to make extra allowance for this when weaving in the weft thread. Otherwise, once the weft is beaten into place, it will cause the warp edges to draw in, and can result in broken warp threads on the edges of the woven piece. One way to avoid this, is to slightly arc the weft when weaving it across.

Arc the Weft

Beating the Weft

On a larger floor or table loom, you will have a reed and beater that will beat the weft into place. With Tapestry looms, the weft is usually beaten with a hand held beater. For this small cardboard box loom you can use a fork.

After each row of weft or pick, use the tines of the fork to beat or gently press the weft into place evenly across the loom.
cardboard loom

Beginner Weaving Looms

Cardboard Loom Project

Spears Loom
How to weave tapestry on a child’s Spears weaving loom.

Double Hole Rigid Heddle
Add beads to your weaving project.

Beginner Weaving Books

Weaving for Beginners: An Illustrated Guide (Peggy Osterkamp’s New Guide to Weaving Series)
Provides beginners with the information they need to weave in a clear and enjoyable step-by-step way.
UK: Weaving for Beginners

Learning to Weave
Learn such basics as three methods for step-by-step warping, basic weaving techniques, project planning, reading and designing drafts, the basics of all the most common weave structures, and many more handy hints.
UK: Learning to Weave

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy
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Handmade Adjustable Floor Rag Rug Twining Loom 48" x 27.5"

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Antique Vintage Nilus Leclerc Loom Tension Box Warp Weaving Wood

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Used Nilus LeClerc Table Loom Model MEDICO # S-22-4-73-00

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Cardboard Loom: aa040201

You don’t need expensive equipment to weave. A flat piece of cardboard or a cardboard box can easily turn into a loom that you can weave mug rugs, placemats or intricate tapestries on. This is a great project for kids or for teaching beginners to weave.

cardboard loom tapestry

To make a simple loom from a cardboard box, find a good sturdy box. (A shoebox might not be strong enough.)

With a sharp knife, cut the flaps off the top of the box. Then using a ruler mark off the
“sett” for the loom at the top edges of the box. If you are going to be using thicker yarns, you can mark use a sett of 4 epi (ends per inch). Make a mark each 1/4 inch along 2 For narrower setts you could use 5 or 6
epi.
With a sharp knife cut a 1/4″ – 1/2″ slit at each of the markings.
cardboard box loom

Use a sturdy cotton or linen yarn for the warp (the lengthwise threads of the woven piece). Secure the end of the warp thread to your cardboard loom with a piece of tape.
Begin to wrap the warp thread around the loom, placing a thread in each slit at the top of the box edge. Continue to wrap the warp around the box.

Tighten any loose threads to an even tension. Then secure the other end of the warp with another piece of tape.

Your warp of your cardboard loom is now threaded and you are ready to begin to weave.

How to weave on your Cardboard Loom

cardboard loom

A Header is woven at the beginning of a project. This can be woven of any type of scrap yarn as usually the header is removed once the project is finished. Try to use a similar weight of yarn as what will be used in the actual piece. The Header helps to align the warp into place, allows you to check for threading errors and gives a good edge for beating the weft into place.

cardboard box loom

Beating the Weft

On a larger floor or table loom, you will have a reed and beater that will beat the weft into place. With Tapestry looms, the weft is usually beaten with a hand held beater. For this small cardboard box loom you can use a fork.

After each row of weft or pick, use the tines of the fork to beat or gently press the weft into place evenly across the loom.

cardboard box loom

Weaving the Weft with Tabby

Use a knitting needle or a small stick to pick up the warp threads. In Tabby or Plain weave, every other warp thread is picked up, so the weft travels over and under each thread.

Rest the knitting needle on the edge of the box to hold the raised threads in place, while you draw the weft thread through the open shed.

For the next row, pick up the alternate warp threads with the knitting needle and weave the weft thread across.

cardboard box loom

On cardboard looms, or simple frame looms, the warp threads are hand manipulated. On larger looms with more harnesses, this task is more automated. The warp yarns are threaded through individual heddles in the harnesses. By raising a harness or shaft, this raises all the heddles that are on the shaft.

For example, on a 4-shaft table or floor loom, the warp yarn is threaded through the 4 shafts or harnesses. For this simple Tabby weave, the first warp thread goes through the first heddle of the first harness.
The 2nd warp thread goes through the first heddle of the second shaft.
The 3rd warp thread goes through the first heddle of the 3rd shaft.
The 4th warp thread goes through the first heddle of the 4th shaft. In a Draft Plan, the threading would look like this:

tabby weave draft

Weaving Weft in Twill

Another type of common pattern in weaving is Twill. The weft threads go over 2 and under 2 warp threads. On the following row, the next 2 threads are picked up and the following 2 warp threads are lowered. This results in a diagonal design running either to the right or left depending on the direction that you are weaving.

Weaving Twill

weave twill

If you number the warp threads: 1,2,3,4 (repeat)

Row 1

Pick up threads 1 and 2, skip over threads 3 and 4, pick up 1 and 2, skip 3, 4 (repeat).

Pass the weft yarn through the open shed.

Row 2

On the 2nd row, move over 1 warp thread from the previous row, and pick up the next 2 threads and lower the following 2.
Skip warp thread 1

Pick up warp threads 2 and 3

Skip threads 4 and 1

Pick up threads 2 and 3

Skip threads 4 and 1Repeat to the end, and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Row 3

Skip warp threads 1 and 2

Pick up threads 3 and 4

Repeat to the end of the row and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Row 4

Pick up warp thread 1

Skip threads 2 and 3

Pick up threads 4 and 1

Skip threads 2 and 3

Pick up threads 4 and 1

Repeat this sequence to the end of the row and pass the weft thread through the open shed.

Twill Variations

Twill is a very versatile weave structure, and you will find many variations in twill design. By changing the direction of the pickup, the diagonals will change to the right or to the left. Twills are also woven by varying the number of warp threads that are picked up or lowered.

twill

Twill Draft

Weaving Clasped Weft

In addition to using twill, tabby or other types of weave structures, an easy way to add interest to your weaving is to use different colored weft yarns. Clasped weft is a technique that uses 2 different colored weft threads in the same row of weaving.

Although this technique is being shown on a cardboard loom, the clasped weft technique can be done on larger looms as well, using 2 shuttles.

Clasp Weft Technique

Advancing the Warp

Are you getting near the end of the box and don’t have room to weave anymore? You don’t have to quit yet, as you still have lots of warp left, wrapped around the box.

box loom weaving

box loom

Slide a knitting needle or other stick under the warp threads at the beginning of your woven piece.

  • Lift up gently on the needle and remove the warp threads from the notches of the box.
  • Gently pull on the warp threads and slide the project forward on the loom, leaving the top end of the warp threads in the other notches.
  • Adjust the tension on the warp threads if necessary, securing them with tape.
  • You are now ready to continue weaving.

Weave a Circle

Although I haven’t done so in this sample project that I wove, you could keep weaving all around the box, creating a complete circle.

Finishing

box loom tapestry

Once you have woven the length of project that you wish to have, cut the warp off the loom, leaving a 2 – 3 inch length of warp at each end for the fringe.

Group 2 or 3 warp ends together and secure with an overhand knot.

Here are some other ideas for weaving with cardboard looms.
2nd Grade Cardboard Loom
These kids in Grade 2 made looms from a flat piece of cardboard and wove some very colorful pieces.
Yarn Weaving
7th Graders wove circular tapestries on paper plates.
Simple Loom Weaving
A lesson plan for weaving on a cardboard loom and learning about the Hispanic and Navajo traditions of weaving in New Mexico.
Childs Elementary School
An inspiring gallery of woven works done by students using different colors and textures of yarns.
Photo Album
Grade 7 and 8 students of Page Middle School wove some pouches on their cardboard looms.
5th Grade Art
5th graders are studying about the arts and crafts of various cultures. They have woven medicine bags on cardboard looms, made ceramic whistles and Aboriginal dot paintings.

Spears Loom
How to weave tapestry on a child’s Spears weaving loom.

Double Hole Rigid Heddle
Add beads to your weaving project.

Beginner Weaving Books

Weaving Made Easy: 17 Projects Using a Simple Loom
The small, portable rigid heddle loom can be used to easily produce loose, drape-friendly fabric as well as dense, sturdy material.
UK: Weaving Made Easy

Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving
Wonderful projects and plain-weave variations, this user-friendly guide covers choosing, setting up, and weaving on a rigid heddle loom.
UK: Hands on Rigid Heddle

The Woven Bag: 30+ Projects from Small Looms (Writers Digest Guides)
Each bag is created using small looms, such as potholder looms, frame looms and knotted mesh looms.
UK: The Woven Bag

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Handweaving – Improving Your Edges: aa011000

How to Weave a Good Edge
One of the biggest challenges for the beginner weaver is to be able to obtain clean edges,
free of loops or tightly drawn wefts that result in broken threads. Don’t despair! With a bit
of practice, your edges will improve.

When a weft yarn travels across the warp, it takes more weft than the width of the warp.
This is because the weft is actually travelling up and down between the warp threads. If you
throw the shuttle across the warp, and have the yarn running straight across, when you beat
the weft down into place, you will not have enough weft yarn to adequately cover the area.
This will result in too much draw-in and can cause the edge warp threads to break.

selvage edge

Instead, when throwing the shuttle allow some extra weft to make allowance for the draw-in.
A simple way to do this, is to throw the shuttle and have the weft yarn travel in a V-shape,
uphill from the edge of the woven cloth up to the reed. When you beat, the extra yarn allowance
will beat into place. You will still have a bit of draw-in but it shouldn’t result in broken
threads. To improve your weaving speed, try not to touch or fiddle with the edges while weaving. It
will take only a bit of practice, but you should notice an improvement.

The other problem that most of us have with selvages, is having loops that stick out
unattractively, instead of a nice clean edge. This happens because too much weft was left out
when the shuttle was thrown across. This can be corrected by a visual check and making an
adjustment with the shuttle.

When throwing from the left to the right, I throw the shuttle with my left hand and catch
it with my right. Then I look to see (don’t touch!) if the weft yarn just thrown is just
touching the outer edge of the selvage. If not, then I give a slight tug on the shuttle to
pull the weft yarn into place. The right edge of the weft yarn is up at an angle almost at the
reed – as in the diagram above. Then I beat, with my left hand, placing the weft into place.
Change sheds and repeat the procedure working from the right.

When you weave, you may notice that one side of your work has a tendency to either have
tighter edges or have more loops. This is because one side of your body is stronger than the
other. You will need to be aware of this and make adjustments to your weaving as necessary to
improve your weaving technique.

How To

How to make a Warping Board
How to Weave a Mirror Warp
How to Use a McMorran Balance
How to Weave Clasped Weft

Weaving Books: Beginner Weaving

The Weaver’s Book: Fundamentals of Handweaving
UK: Fundamentals of Handweaving

Key to Weaving: A Textbook of Hand-Weaving Techniques and Pattern Drafts for the Beginning Weaver
A definitive guide to handloom weaving: step-by-step instructions, intricacies of color, fiber and how to use them effectively.
UK: Key to Weaving

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Handweaving – Clasped Weft: blclaspweft1

In addition to using twill, tabby or other types of weave structures, an easy way to add interest to your weaving is to use different colored weft yarns. Clasped weft is a technique that uses 2 different colored weft threads in the same row of weaving.

Working from the right pass the weft yarn through the open shed, creating a loop on the left side of the warp.

Thread the second yarn color through the loop.

With your right hand, pull the weft yarn back through the open shed, pulling the second yarn with it.

Place the yarns in the location that you want them to be, and straighten out the weft ends.

Beat the weft into place.

Note that this does create 2 rows of weft yarn in the same shed.

How to Weave on a Cardboard Box Loom
Pin Weaving
Tapestry Weaving
Sami Weaving with a Double Hole Reed

Weaving Books

Key to Weaving: A Textbook of Hand-Weaving Techniques and Pattern Drafts for the Beginning Weaver
A definitive guide to handloom weaving: step-by-step instructions, intricacies of color, fiber and how to use them effectively.
UK: Key to Weaving

The Weaver’s Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom
Techniques include leno, Brooks bouquet, soumak, and embroidery on fabric.
UK: Weavers Idea Book

The Woven Bag: 30+ Projects from Small Looms (Writers Digest Guides)
Each bag is created using small looms, such as potholder looms, frame looms and knotted mesh looms.
UK: The Woven Bag

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