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Countermarche Looms

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These photos and diagrams were originally printed in:

Handbok Iveving
J.W. Carpelens Forlag
CentralTrykkeriet, Oslo
1958
I have added the Red lettering to the diagrams, to help in identifying the tie-ups.

When you tie a countermarche loom, all the ties have to be level. All the cords have to be equal length for each harness. Using Texsolv cord makes this an easier task because you can count the number of loops in the cord and also make small adjustments by moving the pegs up or down one loop. I also use a small carpenters level to check that the harnesses are level. There are 2 types of countermarche looms. One of them (Type A) has 2 sets of levers at the top of the loom that rotate on a center axle. A,B, C. The 2 sets of lamms are of equal length. (I, J)

Type A

Countermarche Loom Type B Tie Up

Countermarche Loom Type A Tie Up

Start the tie-up from the top of the loom.

There should be a set of stabilizing pins or rods that are placed through the holes at B & C. These pins hold the jacks or levers in place while you set up your loom. These will need to be removed once your loom has been warped. If the pins are missing, a set of knitting needles works well instead. The outer edges of the top levers (B & C) are tied to the outer edges of the top harness.
D & E.

B – D

C – E

A – The 2 edges of the top levers that are in the center are tied to the center hole of the Bottom Lamm – F.

A – F

The bottom harness is tied at the center – G – to the center hole of the Top Lamm.

G – H Thread the loom with a warp, then make the adjustments for the balancing. The warp should run from the back beam to the front beam, through the eye of the heddles. You may need to adjust the height of the harnesses, so that the warp is level. Make adjustments to the length of the cords running between B-D and C-E. Check that the harnesses are level – use a carpenters level to make check this.

The 2 bottom lamms should be level (I & J)- parallel to the floor. You might need to adjust the cords (A-F) and ( G-H) to raise or lower the lamms slightly.

When you are weaving, the loom should operate quietly. If you hear the sound of banging wood, check if the lamms are hitting each other when you change sheds. ( I – J) If so, then you will need to increase the distance between I & J slightly. Do this by shortening the tie-up between E & F. This raises the Top Lamm (I) a bit. You will also need to adjust the length of the tie-up between the Top Lamm and Pedals (lengthen (I – K) to compensate for the adjustment. Once these are tied, you shouldn’t need to tie them again, unless you are adding extra shafts to your loom.

The other type (Type B)has 1 lever in the center and a set of pulleys. The 2 sets of lamms are different lengths – 1 short (I), the other longer (J).

Countermarche Loom – Type B

The other type (Type B) has 1 lever in the center and a set of pulleys. The 2 sets of lamms are different lengths – 1 short (I), the other longer (J).

Countermarche Loom Tie Up - Type A

Countermarche Loom Tie Up – Type B

Start at the top of the loom.

There should be a stabilizing pin or rod that fits through a set of holes near A. This rod holds the jacks or levers in place while you set up your loom. It will need to be removed once your loom has been warped. If the rod is missing, a knitting needle works well instead. Beginning at the top of the loom, one end of the lever is tied to the top shaft of the harness.

A – B

The other end of the lever (the outer edge) C is tied to the end of the bottom Lamm – D. The other end of the bottom lamm is attached to the loom through a rod that runs on the side of the loom.

C – D

The bottom shaft of the harness (E) is attached at the center, to the centre hole of the Top Lamm – F.

E – F Thread the loom with a warp, then make the adjustments for the balancing. The warp should run from the back beam to the front beam, through the eye of the heddles. You may need to adjust the height of the harnesses, so that the warp is level. Make adjustments to the length of the cords running between A and B. Check that the harnesses are level – use a carpenters level to make check this. The 2 bottom lamms should be level (I & J)- parallel to the floor. You might need to adjust the cords (E-F Upper Lamm) and (C – D Lower Lamm) to raise or lower the lamms slightly.

When you are weaving, the loom should operate quietly. If you hear the sound of banging wood, check if the lamms are hitting each other when you change sheds. ( I – J) If so, then you will need to increase the distance between I & J slightly. Do this by shortening the tie-up between E & F. This raises the Top Lamm (I) a bit. You will also need to adjust the length of the tie-up between the Top Lamm and Pedals (lengthen (I – K) to compensate for the adjustment. Once these are tied, you shouldn’t need to tie them again, unless you are adding extra shafts to your loom.

Weaving Looms

Counterbalance Loom Tie-up

How to Tie up a Countermarche Loom

Handweaving Books

The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory
Handwoven Table Linens: 27 Fabulous Projects from a Master Weaver
A handweaver’s pattern book
A Weaver’s Book of 8-Shaft Patterns: From the Friends of Handwoven

Weaving Looms

 

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This page last edited on September 3, 2017

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