Category Archives: Dyes and Colour

How-to information and supplies for the home dyer.

How to Scour and Mordant Cotton and Linen

The secret to successful natural dyeing of cellulose fibres, yarns and fabrics such as cotton and linen is thorough scouring. The scouring process removes natural oils, waxes and pectins from the fibre so that the dyes can penetrate the fibre more readily. Scouring and mordanting cellulose fibres is a more time consuming process than when mordanting wool and protein fibres. But it is well worth taking the extra time to prepare your fabric before you put it into the dyepot. read more

Spin Flora Dot Com

When I was asked by the AGWSD to teach a workshop on spinning flax this coming summer at their Summer School, I started to do some research on spinning with plant fibres. Never did I expect to fall down such a large rabbit hole! I started by ordering a few small sample packs of different flora fibres, flax, hemp, ramie and a few of the new plant-based fibres such as banana and seacell that have recently come onto the market. I fell in love with the variety and the textures that these plants have to offer. Spinning flora took over in my studio. As I used up my plastic crates filled with wool, they quickly filled up again with a delightful assortment of flora fibres.

Spin and Weave Flora
Spin and Weave Flora
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Fungi Dye: Boletopsis Grisea

Boletopsis grisea Mushroom Dye

FI – Sudenkaapa
SW -tallgraticka

Boletopsis grisea Fungi Dyed Yarn
Boletopsis grisea Fungi Dyed Yarn

Alum Mordant
3 litres water
25 grams alum
10 grams cream of Tartar
Bring to boil and then let cool
100 gram wool yarn tied in skeins
Rinse the clean washed yarn in cool water
Add the yarn into the cool mordant bath and bring it to 80-90 C degrees
Simmer for 1 hour
Remove and let cool read more

Fungi Dye: Hapolopilus Rutilans

Hapilopilus rutilans Mushroom Dye
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Hapalopilus rutilans
FI: Okrakaapa
SW: lysticka

Hapalopilus Rutilans Fungi Dyed Yarn
Hapalopilus Rutilans Fungi Dyed Yarn

Alum Mordant

3 litres water
25 grams alum
10 grams cream of Tartar
Bring to boil and then let cool
100 gram wool yarn tied in skein
Rinse the clean washed yarn in cool water
Add the yarn into the cool mordant bath and bring it to 80-90 C degrees
Simmer for 1 hour
Remove and let cool read more

Indigo Fructose Dye Vat

There are many ways to prepare an indigo vat, some use soda ash and spectralite, some use some use sulphuric acid, some use iron and some urine. For this indigo vat, I am using a fructose base. You can also use ageing fruit instead of fructose sugar.

The fructose indigo vat was developed by Michel Garcia. The addition of the fructose sugar acts as a reducing agent to the Indigo. The sugar removes one of the oxygen molecules from the indigo making it soluble in water.
The addition of the Calcium Hydroxide (slaked or hydrated lime) changes the pH from an acid to a base. The proper pH to get good colour on wool should be about +9 and for cotton and cellulose +10. read more

Spin Flora – Bamboo Staple

Bamboo Staple

Bamboo staple fibre is produced mechanically via a retting process, similar to flax production. The woody bamboo stems are crushed and natural enzymes break down the stems so the fibres can be combed out and spun. This is a very labour intensive process.

Bamboo Staple Fibre
Bamboo Staple Fibre

I have spun bamboo staple fibre before and the fibers were quite long and easy to spin in a worsted spinning style. For this particular batch of bamboo fibre, the fibers are quite short and feel much like cotton. So I decided to use a cotton spinning method. I carded some of the fibre on my drum carder and rolled it into small rolags. read more