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Paper Yarn Placemats Weaving Pattern

This pattern is woven in tabby but use different types of yarns giving an interesting effect. The placemats and table runner are woven using 22/2 cottolin for warp. This is woven in a thick/thin rep weave, using paper yarn and hemp single ply tow yarn as the weft. You can substitute the hemp with a single ply linen yarn, a cotton yarn or the same type of cottolin that you used in the warp.

This pattern will make 4 placemats and 1 table runner.

Warp

Warp: 22/2 cottolin, 3160 ypp
>Warp Length: 6 yards
Black – 40 ends
Navy – 180 ends
Black – 40 ends
Sett: 20 epi
Width in Reed: 13 inches
placemat weaving draft

Weft

For the edges of each placemat, weave 2 inches of tabby using the 22/2 cottolin yarn.
The placemat is woven in tabby using 2 shuttles alternating shots of:
Paper yarn – 430 ypp (White)
6/1 Hemp – 1800 ypp (various colours)
Weft: 16 ppi
To weave with paper yarn, the yarn must be damp. Wind the yarn onto a bobbin. Fill a bowl of water and soak the bobbin for a few minutes to wet the yarn. Wipe the bobbin with a dry wash cloth to remove the excess water.

Placemat Pattern length: 16 inches
For these placemats, I used a different colour of hemp weft for each placemat, so that each one is slightly different, but complementary.

Table Runner Pattern length:

30 inches
The table runner was woven with varied stripes of colour: red, green, blue, yellow.

Finishing

Cut the hem between each placemat, and sew.

Care and Washing

It is best not to wash paper placemats in the washing machine. Rather, they can be wiped clean with a damp cloth, or can be gently handwashed.

Yarn Sources

Borgs VavgarnerA great source for linen and paper yarns from Sweden.

 

45" FLOOR LOOM LeClerc Mira 4-harness Open End Bench Warping Board

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Tabletop Kliot Tapestry Loom 20" Hard Wood

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Beka 4 Inch Beginners Rigid Heddle Weaving Loom - Made in the USA!

Beka 4 Inch Beginners Rigid Heddle Weaving Loom - Made in the USA!
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Clover Beading Loom #CL9910 - New

Clover Beading Loom #CL9910 - New
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How to Make a Tin Embroidered Key Chain

Tenntrådsbroderi, or embroidering with pewter or tin thread is almost a lost art. The Saami used tin thread since the 1600’s to decorate their clothing. The tin was obtained by melting down old pewter plates and dishes and was spun into thread. The use of pewter thread has recently become fashionable in jewellery items such as pewter braided reindeer leather bracelets worn by actors such as Benedict Cumberbatch.

Tin thread is quite difficult to work with and requires a lot of patience and practice to make. This is a how-to project for making a reindeer leather keychain with tin embroidery.

Working with tin and leather can also be quite hard on your hands so if you have any hand, wrist or shoulder problems, please do not try this project. If you do this project or any other needlework project be sure to take frequent breaks and or work on a different type of project, to give your hands a rest.

Reindeer Leather Keyring

Reindeer Leather Keyring

Materials
You will need:
a small piece of reindeer leather, about 9 cm x 7 cm
a narrow strip of reindeer leather, 1.5 cm x 24 cm
Tin thread, about 1 meter length
a small square of wool felt, wadmal or a sturdy piece of wool cloth, about 7 cm x 7 cm
light iron on interfacing, linen fabric or natural cotton fabric, about 7 cm x 7 cm
fine leather needle
sewing needle
thimble
silk thread or good quality polyester thread
invisible sewing thread
metric graph paper
fine permanent marker felt tip pens

The Pattern
Sketch the pattern onto metric lined graph paper. This pattern has been drawn on 5 mm lined graph paper.

Snowflake tin embroidery pattern

Snowflake embroidery pattern

Trace the pattern onto iron on interfacing using a permanent marker. I have marked the end points of each snowflake with dark blue ink. This makes it easier to see the end of the stitch when you are embroidering.

Snowflake Embroidery

Snowflake Embroidery

Iron the interfacing onto the back of the small piece of wool felt or fabric. In this example I have used a small piece of handmade wool felt but you can use wadmal (which is a woven wool fabric that has been felted) or other sturdy wool fabric. I have also used linen fabric for the pattern rather than interfacing, because I happened to have some in my stash.
I have stitched the fabric onto the felt using a basting stitch.

Tin Thread Embroidery Pattern

Tin Thread Embroidery Pattern

Tin Thread
You will need about a meter of tin thread for this project. If you have a longer length of tin such as on a spool, don’t cut it at this point. Instead I sew with it while it is still on the spool and cut the end when I am done, so that I don’t have any waste as the pewter thread is quite expensive to buy.

Tin Thread

Tin Thread

Tin thread comes in a number of thicknesses ranging from .25 to .5 in diameter. For this project I have used .3 but you can use a finer tin thread .25 or a thicker one if that is what you have on hand.

Tin Thread Unraveling

Tin Thread Unraveling

To make it easier to thread the end through to the back of the felt, you will need to unravel a bit of the tin from the core thread. The tin has been spun around a core thread. Pinch the end of the thread between your thumb and forefinger about 2 cm from the end. With your other hand give a bit of a twist to the thread. The tin will untwist and can be stretched out.

Tin Thread Unwound

Tin Thread Unwound

Starting at the centre of the snowflake thread your sewing needle through the felt and pull the unraveled ends of the tin thread through to the back of the work.

Tin Thread Sewing

Tin Thread Sewing

Tin Thread Sewing

Tin Thread Sewing

Tin Thread Embroidery
Thread a sewing needle with the invisible nylon thread. I find it best to tie a couple of knots at the end of the thread, one on top of another to make a secure knot.
Sew a few stitches to secure the ends of the tin thread to the back of the fabric.

Using the pattern drawn on the back of the work as your guide, follow carefully along the lines as you stitch the tin thread to the wool felt. Pull the needle to the front of the work, and stitch the tin thread to the wool felt. Work your way along the pattern being careful to keep the stitches in line with the pattern. Use very small stitches to sew the work.

Tin Thread Embroidery

Tin Thread Embroidery

When you get to a corner, push the needle through to the front of the work, and wrap the tin thread around the needle to form the corner. I give the tin thread a bit of a pinch to help hold the shape. Sew the corner securely in place. Pewter thread is quite soft. The thread can break while you are working with it, so do this carefully.

Tin Thread Embroidery

Tin Thread Embroidery

Tin Thread Embroidery

Tin Thread Embroidery

Once you have stitched your way around the pattern cut the tin thread leaving an end of about 2 cm. Pinch the end of the thread and unravel it as before.
Thread this through to the back of the work.

Tin Thread Embroidery

Tin Thread Embroidery

Reindeer Leather
Draw an outline cutting pattern for the key fob on a piece of graph paper and cut it out.

Key Fob Pattern

Key Fob Pattern

Using this paper pattern cut the embroidered felt to the shape of the key fob pattern.

Cut a piece of reindeer leather using the same pattern.

Put the cut reindeer leather and the embroidered felt together. Using the leather needle threaded with polyester or silk thread, stitch around both of them using a whip stitch. Fold the end section of the reindeer leather under and stitch into place.
To make the key fob a bit thicker insert a small piece of plastic or other thick material in between the felt and the leather.

Reindeer Leather Snowflake

Reindeer Leather Snowflake

Reindeer Leather Edge Finish
Fold the 24 cm strip of reindeer leather in half and cut a small slit in the centre. This will fit over the top part of the key fob.

Reindeer Leather Key Fob

Reindeer Leather Key Fob

Leather Key Fob

Leather Key Fob

Sew the leather edge to the key fob using small backstitching.

Reindeer Leather Keyring

Reindeer Leather Keyring

Paivatar Yarn on Etsy

I hope that you will visit my shop on Etsy and add a like.

More About Sami Duodji

Sami Art of Tin Thread Spinning
Sami Reindeer Bracelets
What is Sami Duodji
Sami Open Braid Weaving
Beaivi Rigid Heddle Weaving Video

Saami Music – Itunes

Binna Banna – Kikki Aikio
Áphi (Wide As Oceans) – Sofia Jannok
Ulda – Ulla Pirttijärvi & Ulda
The Kautokeino Rebellion (Music from the Movie) – Herman Rundberg, Mari Boine & Svein Schultz
Beaivi, Áhcázan (The Sun, My Father) – Nils-Aslak Valkeapää

Saami Books

God Wears Many Skins: Sami Myth and Folklore in a New Poetic Interpretation (Voices of Indigenous Peoples)
With the Lapps in the High Mountains: A Woman among the Sami, 1907-1908
Saami: A Cultural Encyclopaedia
Lapps and Labyrinths: Saami Prehistory, Colonization, and Cultural Resilience

Black Bean Dye Recipe

I had heard that it was possible to dye yarns using black beans but have never tried it before so last week when I went grocery shopping I looked for some. I purchased a 500 gram bag of Turtle Black Beans from my local Waitrose grocery store.

I placed all of the beans into a large plastic jar and covered them with ordinary tap water. Overnight, the beans expanded and filled the whole jar, so then I split the bean solution into 2 jars and added more water. I let this bean stock sit on my kitchen counter for 3 days. The water in the jars started to look quite blue so I was hopeful that this would work.
Meanwhile, I spun 100 grams of white wool and divided the wool into 2 50 gram skeins.

Alum Mordant
I mordanted the wool in a 5% solution of alum and water. (5 grams of alum to 100 grams of wool) I left the wool in the hot mordant for about an hour, then I turned off the heat and let the yarn sit in the mordant solution until cool.
I then strained out the dye water from the beans into 2 plastic bowls and placed the skeins of wool into the dye solution. I refilled the bean jars with water, as I am hoping that I will be able to extract more dye from the beans.

Wool in Dye Bath
This is the wool in the black bean dye bath after about 2 hours.

Black Beans Dye

Black Beans Dyepot

I let the wool sit overnight in the black bean dye bath – pH 5.

Black beans dye

Black Beans Dyepot pH5

I removed the wool from one of the bowls and added some washing soda to the dyebath to change the pH to 9. Then I put the yarn back into the bath. Almost immediately the colour changed to more of a grey-blue shade.

Black beans dyepot

Wool in Black Bean Dye pH9

Black Bean Dye Batch No. 1
On Left – wool dyed with black beans and alum – pH5
On Right – wool dyed with black beans and alum – pH9
The blue wool turned to a greyer shade of blue when the pH was changed to 9 with the addition of washing soda

Wool Dyed with Black Beans

Wool Dyed with Black Beans

I am pleased with the results so far. My only concern is whether they will be very colorfast or will fade in daylight. I will put some into a sunny window for the next month to see if any fading occurs.

I am also going to repeat this experiment using a different mordant solution, so please stay tuned.


Natural Dye Recipes
Tin Mordant
Alum Mordant

 

Hand dyed Linen fabric Natural Yellow from Osage 66"x45" Colonial Reenactment

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Wool Dying Kit and a Book on natural Dyes

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Hand dyed Cotton muslin fabric natural Yellow from Osage 60"x55" Handmade

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1/2 lb Alum Aluminum Sulphate for Marbling Supplies Marbled Goods Mordant Paper

1/2 lb Alum Aluminum Sulphate for Marbling Supplies Marbled Goods Mordant Paper
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The Saami Art of Tin Thread Spinning

Tugging on a bit of pewter thread has led me down a new path of unraveling some of the intricately beautiful textile crafts of my ancestors.

Tin Thread Embroidery

Pewter
The first use of pewter dates back to the Bronze Age. Pewter was used by the Egyptians and later the Romans, and came into use in Europe for tableware and jewellery from the Middle Ages.

Pewter is a malleable metal alloy, traditionally 85–99% tin, with the remainder consisting of copper, antimony, bismuth and sometimes, less commonly today, lead. Silver is also sometimes used. Copper and antimony act as hardeners while lead is common in the lower grades of pewter, which have a bluish tint.
Wikipedia – Pewter

Although pewter was an alloy of tin and other metals such as lead, in modern day pewter or tin thread,heavy metals are no longer used. Silver is added to stabilize the tin instead.

Thread spun from metals such as gold and silver have been found in Viking age textiles in sites such as Birka. Pewter or tin could also be spun into thread and used for the making of jewellery or decoration for clothing. Pewter became known as the poor man’s silver. It is thought that the use of pewter thread has only been produced by the Saami. Earliest evidence of the use pewter thread has been found in Saami textiles from the 1600’s, though fragments of pewter have been found 500 years earlier.

Saami Embroidered Tin Bag

Saami Tin Embroidery

Saami Embroidered Tin Collar

Tin Thread Making Tools
The tools for making pewter or tin thread are a die made from reindeer antlers and a spindle. The die is carved from a reindeer antler and has as many as 60 different sized holes drilled into it. The tin is dragged through the successively smaller holes until a fine tin thread is produced.

Die for Dragging Tin
Die made of reindeer antler, used for dragging and making tin thread.
tenntrad die
Spin Cross
Spindle for spinning tin thread
Spin Cross

Linnaeus: Tin Dragging and Spinning
Linnaeus Drag and Spin Tin

Dragging Tin Thread
The tin thread was produced from bars of tin or from tin melted down from pewter plates and tableware. The tin is formed into narrow bars with a knife and hammer. It is pounded and shaped into a rod or dowel and pulled through the holes in the die with the use of pliers or even teeth.
to make it easier to pull through the die, the tin is dipped in fat, produced by melting reindeer hooves.

Tin is being pulled through the die with the use of pliers.

Tin thread is being pulled through smaller holes in the die.
Dragging Tin Thread

Fine tin thread is being dragged through the die with the use of teeth.
Dragging Tin with Teeth

Spinning Tin Thread

After the tin has been dragged, it is plied with a core thread using either a drop spindle or a Spin Cross.
Spinning Tin onto Spin Cross
Tin Spinning

The core thread should be the same thickness as the tin wire, in order to produce an evenly spun thread. The tin wraps around the core as it is spun using a similar plying technique as with other core spun yarns.

Tin Thread
Tin Thread Spinning
Tin Thread Core
Tin Thread Spindle

Tin Thread Embroidery
The spun tin thread can now be used for embroidery. It can be sewn directly onto tanned leather, though wool fabric or wadmal is used more often as the base for the embroidered thread.

Sewing Tin Thread

The core thread is sewn to the back of the fabric to fasten the tin thead in place.
Tin Thread Embroidery

The tin thread is stitched to the top side of the leather or fabric with very small stitches.
Tin Thread Embroidery
Tin Thread Sewing

Wadmal
Wadmal is a coarse, densely woven wool fabric that has been felted so that the weave structure is no longer visible. This creates a very warm and windproof fabric.
Instead of embroidering onto wadmal, I thought that I would try to embroider the tin thread onto handmade felt instead, as the felt would have a similar weight and consistency as wool felted yardage. I felted a small sheet of 21 micron merino wool and stitched a small sample of tin thread embroidery. I was quite pleased with the result.

Tin Thread Embroidery on Felt

References:

Västerbotten nummer 2/1980, sidorna 115-128 “Om tillverkning av platt tenntråd”
Västerbotten nummer 3/1970 “Sameslöjd”
Reindeer Antler Die
Vadmal and Other Woolens

More Saami Crafts

Saami Reindeer Bracelets
What is Sami Duodji
Weaving on a Sami Rigid Heddle
How to Make a Tin Embroidery Key Chain

Reindeer Leather and Tin Embroidery PurseReindeer and Pewter Purse
Reindeer Leather and Pewter Purse on Etsy

Saami Music – Itunes

Binna Banna – Kikki Aikio
Áphi (Wide As Oceans) – Sofia Jannok
Ulda – Ulla Pirttijärvi & Ulda
The Kautokeino Rebellion (Music from the Movie) – Herman Rundberg, Mari Boine & Svein Schultz
Beaivi, Áhcázan (The Sun, My Father) – Nils-Aslak Valkeapää

 

Embroidery Sewing Machine Singer Studio S10 Digital Screen Monogram Craft Stitch

Embroidery Sewing Machine Singer Studio S10 Digital Screen Monogram Craft Stitch
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Car in the park

Car in the park
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Oriental Blossoms Pillow Cover Kit Dimensions NIP Pat Zitomer 1125 Geisha A1

Oriental Blossoms Pillow Cover Kit Dimensions NIP Pat Zitomer 1125 Geisha  A1
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How to Make a Sami Reindeer Bracelet

Saami Reindeer Leather Bracelets

One of the traditional Saami duodji crafts is leathermaking. I thought I would give it a try. I started with something simple by purchasing a Sami bracelet kit from a Sami supplier in Sweden TNKReativt.

Sami reindeer bracelet kit
The bracelet kit includes a piece of reindeer leather, tin thread, artificial sinew, clear nylon thread, sewing thread, a sewing needle, a leather needle and a reindeer antler button.

Weave the Braid
The kit includes enough tin thread to make a six strand braid.
Cut the tin thread into 3 equal lengths and fold these in half to create 6 strands.
I use a foam felting mat to work on.
Pin the folded end of the tin thread onto the foam mat.
Separate the 6 strands into 3 strands of 2 threads each.
Work a 3 strand braid along the length of the thread.
I pin the braid onto the foam about every inch or so, to hold it in place as I am braiding.

When you have finished braiding, secure the ends by tying a short piece of sinew around the ends. The sinew that is supplied is a short length, but this can be separated into several strands. Use a small strand to tie the tin braid.

Hand Stitch Braid to Leather Strip

To adjust the bracelet to the correct size, measure around your wrist. Add 1 cm to this measurement. Cut the length of reindeer leather to this size.

On the back side of the leather strip, measure and mark a cutting line 1.5 cm from the end of both ends.

Fold the leather strip in half and carefully cut a small slit into the leather, the width of the woven tin braiding.

Place the woven braid on the right side of the leather strip and slip the ends of the braid into the slits that you have cut.

Using the regular sewing needle that came with the kit and the nylon thread, stitch the braid onto the leather strip.
(The instructions that came with the kit, suggest using glue to attach the braid to the leather, but I do not recomment this) Hand stitching will make a better bracelet.

Attach Braided Loop to Leather Bracelet

The bracelet kit includes a short piece of leather strip and some imitation sinew. Split the sinew into a narrower thread and twist the sinew around the leather strip. The sinew will give the leather a bit of extra strength in the loop.

Thread the leather strip and sinew through the loop at the end of the tin braid. Then twist the leather strip and sinew together tightly and ply them together to make a spun thread. Tie the ends with the remaining sinew.


Thread the leather sewing needle with the end of the sinew and stitch the 2 ends of the leather braid together forming a loop. Sew this securely.

Trim the cut ends of the tin braid to 1 cm. Sew these end together with a bit of sinew.

Finishing
Using the leather needle, thread it with the polyester thread that came with the kit.
At the back of the bracelet, fold the ends of the leather together and neatly stitch them together.

Sew the reindeeer antler button to the other end of the bracelet.

Saami Reindeer Bracelet

Additional Tools

Once you have made your first Saami bracelet you might decide that you like working with leather, as I did. To make life easier, you will need to purchase a few extra tools.
1) A good lamp with a magnifying glass. Once I bought one, I don’t know how I managed without it. The hand can do what the eyes can see.
Mighty Bright LED Floor Light and Magnifier

2) Extra Leather Sewing Needles
It’s helpful to have a few different sizes on hand.
Leather Hand Needles-Assorted 3/Pkg

3) A good sewing thimble.
I like the Clover ones as I find them quite comfortable to wear.
Clover 6026 Medium Protect and Grip Thimble

4) Synthetic Sinew
Use synthetic sinew for stitching leather pieces together. Sinew comes in different colours, but I find the natural one is suitable for most uses.
Natural Simulated Sinew

5) Jewellery Making Pliers
Use for tin embroidery to pinch tin thread into shape before stitching.
ToolUSA Jeweler’s Complete 6-Piece Precision Plier Set

6) Good quality sewing thread.
The polyester threads are good but I prefer to use silk thread. I find it has less tendency to shred while stitching.
Original Guetermann Silk Sewing Thread; 110 yards/100 meters, Color 000 (black)

More Saami Crafts

How to weave with a Beaivi double hole heddle.
How to Make a Tin Embroidery Key Chain
Saami Art of Tin Thread Spinning

Saami Reindeer Leather Purse

Reindeer Leather Purse
Saami Reindeer Leather Purse on Etsy

Saami Music – Itunes

Binna Banna – Kikki Aikio
Áphi (Wide As Oceans) – Sofia Jannok
Ulda – Ulla Pirttijärvi & Ulda
The Kautokeino Rebellion (Music from the Movie) – Herman Rundberg, Mari Boine & Svein Schultz
Beaivi, Áhcázan (The Sun, My Father) – Nils-Aslak Valkeapää

What is Sami Duodji

Sami Duodji is all traditional handicraft that is made by the Saami people. The crafts are both artistic and have a functional purpose such as tools, clothing, knives, cups, bags, hats, belts, laces. These items have been made by hand for many centuries and were used in everyday Sami life.
Recently there has been a growing interest in Sami crafts throughout the world. I think it is wonderful that other crafts people are learning about traditional Sami style handicrafts and techniques.

In the early 1970’s, the Sami organized their cottage industry into Sami Duodji craft organizations whose purpose is to promote Sami handicrafts and provide an advocacy and monitoring role in quality control, training and professional development. The organizations help to ensure raw materials and supplies for makers and producers, and promote the protection and legal knowledge on a non-profit basis. Also the organizations help to foster contacts with government entities and organizations in the Nordic countries.

Members of the Sami Duodji association use a Duodji mark that identifies the products as made by authentic Sami people. The Duodji mark is administered by different organizations.
In Finland, Sami Duodji Finland
In Norway “Sámiid Duodji”
In Sweden, “Riksorganisationen Same Ätnam2
In Russia, “CEPES Sam Arts and Crafts Association”

To be a member of the Sami Duodji organization the person must have previous handicraft training and experience.
The Sámi means a person who considers himself a Sámi, and
– Who has learned the Sami language as their first language, or the father, mother, grandmother, or grandfather has learned Sami as their first language, or
– Whose parents meet at least one of these Sami mentioned conditions

Sami Duodji Trademark

The purpose of the Sami Duodji trademark :
– The mark is a trademark of Sámi handicraft
– Indicates the buyers that the manufacturer of the goods is the Sami
– To protect Sami handicraft quality
– To be a sign that the Sámi handicraft is a living tradition.
The products must be developed in a traditional way or use traditional materials.
Products that are intended for souvenirs and have no traditional or functional use, do not use Sámi Duodji trademark.

Please help support the Sami Duodji craft industry by purchasing products made by Saami people or purchasing materials for your crafts from Sami suppliers.

As my father was a Saami, born in Kola and lived in Petsamo throughout most of his childhood, I consider myself also to be Saami. My grandmother earned her living by herding reindeer and making handicrafts. She traveled to Norway during the summer months to sell her crafted items. Therefore I have a strong interest in learning more about the Saami duodji crafts of my ancestors. As I pursue this area of study, I will be posting articles on my explorations.

Saami Handicrafts

Saami Double Slot Weaving Reed
Beaivi – How to Weave on a Double Hole Sami Heddle

Saami Music – Itunes

Binna Banna – Kikki Aikio
Áphi (Wide As Oceans) – Sofia Jannok
Ulda – Ulla Pirttijärvi & Ulda
The Kautokeino Rebellion (Music from the Movie) – Herman Rundberg, Mari Boine & Svein Schultz
Beaivi, Áhcázan (The Sun, My Father) – Nils-Aslak Valkeapää

Nilus Tapestry Loom for Sale

Used Tapestry Loom for Sale:
Upright tapestry loom – Made by Nilus Leclerc of Quebec, Canada. Model: Tissart. two Harnesses – two Treadle 60 inch weaving width .

This model was discontinued several years ago so they are hard to find now. Drawing and parts list can be found on the Leclerc website at http://www.leclerclooms.com/draw_inst/da_tissart.PDF

The loom is in great, but used condition. It comes with one 60″ reed and the original Leclerc Manual. There is no bench. The loom is currently assembled and located in Lemont, IL (Chicago area) Would prefer pick up as shipping would be very expensive.

Price $800

Please contact Betty Kirk for more information.
Email:
bbkirk at sbcglobal.net

Nilus tapestry loom

 

 

45" FLOOR LOOM LeClerc Mira 4-harness Open End Bench Warping Board

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Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities

Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities
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Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities
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Schacht 4 harness table top weaving loom 20" width

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$183.50
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NEW Advanced Weaving Loom

NEW Advanced Weaving Loom
Current price:
$185.29
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NEW Advanced Weaving Loom
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Leclerc Nilus Loom for Sale

For sale: 36″ LeClerk Nilus Rising Shed
4 harness, 3 reeds (6 dents, 10 dents & 12 dents).
Warping board, raddle, yarn winder
Shuttles (4 boat shuttles, 3 flat & 1 rag). Assorted bobbins.

$600 cash, pickup only by appointment.
Nanaimo BC.

Please contact Liz for more information
Email:
Lizmlaw at gmail.com

 

<img src=”http://www.allfiberarts.com/library/graphics/used/36leclercNilus600.jpg” width=”600″ height=”450″ alt=”Leclerc Nilus loom” />

 

 

45" FLOOR LOOM LeClerc Mira 4-harness Open End Bench Warping Board

Current price:
$1,650.00
Ends in:
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Seller: eBay

Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities

Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities
Current price:
$500.00
Type:
Auction
No. of bids so far:
22
Ends in:
0d 2h 59m
Weaving Loom Masterweaver - Easy to use - Endless design posibilities
Seller: eBay

Schacht 4 harness table top weaving loom 20" width

Current price:
$183.50
Type:
Auction
No. of bids so far:
6
Ends in:
0d 5h 42m
Seller: eBay

NEW Advanced Weaving Loom

NEW Advanced Weaving Loom
Current price:
$185.29
Ends in:
0d 16h 41m
NEW Advanced Weaving Loom
Seller: eBay
 

This page last edited on November 5, 2014

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All Fiber Arts by Paivi Suomi is licensed under a
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