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KeepsakeQuilting

How to Tie on a Sectional Warp Beam

A sectional warp beam is great to have for long warps. In sectional warping, the warp is wound onto the back beam in sections, usually 1 – 2 inch widths at a time. The warp runs through a tension box, that helps to maintain even tension while winding.

However, for shorter warps, I find that using the sectional beam/tension box can be a bit cumbersome. Instead, I prefer to use the Front-to-Back method of beaming illustrated in a previous feature. As there is no apron rod to tie the warp threads to on a sectional beam, I use the following work-around.

For each section of the warp beam, I have cut a length of cotton seine twine (any sturdy cotton or linen yarn will do) that is twice the distance from the back beam to the harnesses of the loom. Fold this piece of yarn in half and tie a knot. Then loop it around the metal rod that is attached to the back beam.

As I thread the heddles, I group the ends together in 1 inch sections with an overhand knot (as my sectional beam is in 1 inch sections) For example, if the sett is 20 epi then I tie together 20 ends.

This group of warp ends is then fastened to the length of yarn from the sectional beam with a snitch knot.

I use a lease stick to cover the knots as the warp is wound onto the back beam. You will also need to make sure that the warp winds on evenly into the sections to avoid tension problems. Using this method reduces a considerable amount of loom waste as you will be able to weave almost to the end of your warp.

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This page last edited on July 27, 2013

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